Conference Programme

Downloadable programme

Jun
23
Tue
Leadership Seminar (By invitation) @ Haldane Room, Ground Floor, Wilkins Building, UCL
Jun 23 @ 8:30 am – 5:30 pm
LIBER Executive Board Meeting (Executive Board) @ Seminar Room, Dr Lee Centre, Fourth Floor
Jun 23 @ 9:00 am – 10:30 am
COFFEE BREAK (Executive Board) @ Seminar Room, Dr Lee Centre, Fourth Floor
Jun 23 @ 10:30 am – 11:00 am
LIBER Executive Board Meeting (Executive Board) @ Seminar Room, Dr Lee Centre, Fourth Floor
Jun 23 @ 11:00 am – 12:30 pm
Registration Open @ Entrance Hall, Ground Floor
Jun 23 @ 12:00 pm – 6:00 pm
LUNCH (Executive Board) @ Seminar Room, Dr Lee Centre, Fourth Floor
Jun 23 @ 12:30 pm – 2:00 pm
Copyright Working Group Meeting (By invitation) @ Torrington Room 104, First Floor
Jun 23 @ 1:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Scholarly Communication Research Infrastructures SC Workshop: Libraries and research data: Towards a new leadership role, Part 1 @ Chancellor’s Hall, First Floor
Jun 23 @ 1:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Libraries and research data: Towards a new leadership role

Abstract

Several institutions are stepping up their capacity for training and support for research data management. In this workshop we will examine some of their experiences in this area, surveying the types of support services that are needed, and the various ways in which libraries are implementing them. We will demonstrate the new training that is being provided, and how this is being embedded into existing provision, as well as the role played by data interviews understanding researchers’ workflows and needs.

In most cases the starting point is university policy on research data management, which provides a framework for good data management practices. In addition, research funders increasingly require researchers to provide information as part of their funding proposals on how they will manage research data for their projects. In order to help researchers with these tasks, several forms of support are being developed by facilitators within the university. However, there remains a gap between policy and practice, between ideals and their implementation. The goal of this workshop is to provide practical suggestions, concrete ideas, and best practices to fill this gap.

In Part One (Tuesday 23 June), we will look at RDM policies and the forms of support they are stimulating. General policies are often sparse in detail; disciplinary policies, on the other hand often provide more practical suggestions for RDM support.

Issues addressed in Part One:

  • How to link strategy, policies and partnerships for data support?
  • What do institutional and disciplinary RDM policies entail?
  • What forms of support can be derived from these policies?
  • What do research funders expect and how can researchers be supported?
  • Which department is responsible for which forms of support?

Programme

Welcome and introduction to the workshop; Wolfram Horstmann, Birgit Schmidt, University of Göttingen; Rob  Grim, Radboud University

Libraries and research data management: Towards a new leadership role; Wolfram Horstmann

Keynote: Research data management: The researcher’s perspective; Andrew Cox, University of Sheffield

Strategies for data support

1. Research data as a research output, data typology; Mike Mertens, RLUK

2. Data management plans based on digital workflow and role models: A report on a DMP project within the frame of e-Infrastructures Austria

Translating policy into RDM support

3. Translating policy into RDM support at Radboud University; Mijke Jetten, Radboud University

4. Translating policy into RDM support at the University of Edinburgh; Sarah Jones, Digital Curation Centre, University of Glasgow

Hands-on: Translating policy into support, Session chair: Birgit Schmidt.

Facilitators: Paolo Budroni, Rob Grim, Mijke Jetten, Sarah Jones, Maaike Messelink, Mike Mertens, Barbara Sánchez Solís

Participants work in groups and use an institutional or policy from different research areas to set up a support model (3-4 examples altogether).

Tasks for each group:

–              Agree on a rapporteur.

–              Read the policy individually.


 

In Part Two of the workshop (Wednesday 24 June), we will examine experiences with RDM training, i.e. which groups are targeted, what materials used, and what strategies are applied. We will discuss how to move towards providing practical advice for writing research data management plans. Training efforts will certainly help raise awareness, in particular among young researchers. But this does not seem to be sufficient for establishing working relationships that last beyond the event. Therefore, further effort is needed to turn awareness into opportunities for closer collaboration and hands-on training.

Issues addressed in Part Two:

  • Training for RDM: Which are the most effective models, methods, and learning objectives?
  • Writing and reviewing data management plans, data interviews, and more.

 

Programme

Welcome and introduction to the workshop, recap of day 1 Wolfram Horstmann, Birgit Schmidt, University of Göttingen; Rob Grim, Radboud University

Data management training and support for data management plans

1. Opportunities to tune your training through FOSTER Dan North, LIBER

2. Supporting researchers with data management plans: providing guidance, tools and reviewing Sarah Jones, Digital Curation Centre (DCC)

3. Reviewing data management plans for Horizon 2020 grant proposals Mari Elisa Kuusniemi, University of Helsinki

Hands-on:  How to review data management plans?

Session chair: Birgit Schmidt

Facilitators: Paolo Budroni, Rob Grim, Sarah Jones, Dan North, Mijke Jetten, Mari Elisa Kuusniemi, Maaike Messelink, Barbara Sánchez Solís

Participants review data management plans (DMPs) in groups by research area: humanities, social sciences, sciences. All groups agree on a rapporteur and report back about their results.

Tasks for each group:

–              Agree on a rapporteur.

–              Read the DMP individually.

–              Consider the researcher’s perspective, what kind of data is under consideration, how is it collected?

–              Make notes or comments and collect questions for clarification and refinement of the plan.

–              Discuss the main points and make summary.

In addition, please come up with one recommendation on how LIBER could help to strengthen the role of libraries in this activity area.

Outcomes & next steps

Wolfram Horstmann, all rapporteurs and facilitators

Each group has 5 minutes to report their results to the plenary including one recommended next step.


 

Advocacy and Communications Steering Committee Meeting (By invitation) @ Bloomsbury Room G35, Ground Floor
Jun 23 @ 2:00 pm – 3:30 pm
NEREUS Workshop: Open Data, Restricted Data and the Library Role – Practical Cases in Economics and Social Sciences @ Woburn Suite, Ground Floor
Jun 23 @ 2:00 pm – 6:00 pm

NEREUS Workshop: Open Data, Restricted Data and the Library Role – Practical Cases in Economics and Social Sciences

Abstract

Open Science and Open Data have become hot topics in recent years. Effective research data management is increasingly emphasised by research funders while infrastructure institutions worldwide are busy establishing various tools and services to support researchers and the research data lifecycle. How successful have been these approaches? How open could or should data be and what role(s) can libraries play to support researchers more effectively? Research indicates that infrastructure institutions see their expertise within the area of RDM. However, there are clear distinctions in how different disciplines, even within the same institution, will make use of the various available repositories.

The workshop attempts to address these issues with a particular focus on economics and social sciences. Organised by NEREUS (Network of European Libraries in Economics and Social Sciences), the first part of the workshop features presentations from several notable institutions who will discusses their experiences of establishing research data management and RD services. The presentations will highlight the various demands researchers face in this area and also the role(s) libraries can play in the administration or management of open and restricted research data. The second part of the workshop will comprise small group discussions, culminating in summary plenary discussion. The workshop is free and open but, due to limited space, registration is required.

AGENDA

Marc van den Beg: Nereus Supporting Research

Paul Ayris: Open Science, Open Data, researchers’ attitudes and the Library role

Sven Vlaeminck: ZBW’s role in establishing services for RDM in economics

Laurence Horton: Setting Up a Research Data Management Support Service at the LSE

Sarah Cadorel and Cynthia Pedroja: “BeQuali “: An infrastructure project for reutilisation of qualitative research in the social sciences

Paul Plaatsman: Open data, restricted data and the library role – Practical cases with regards to economics and the social sciences

Discussion

Nereus report on data workshop, London 2015

 

 

 

Reshaping the Research Library Steering Committee Meeting (By invitation) @ Bedford Room G37, Ground Floor
Jun 23 @ 2:00 pm – 3:30 pm
COFFEE BREAK @ MacMillan Hall/Crush Hall, Ground Floor
Jun 23 @ 3:30 pm – 4:00 pm
Advocacy and Communications Steering Committee Meeting (By invitation) @ Bloomsbury Room G35, Ground Floor
Jun 23 @ 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Reshaping the Research Library Steering Committee Meeting (By invitation) @ Bedford Room G37, Ground Floor
Jun 23 @ 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Digital Collections Working Group (By invitation) @ Bedford Room G37, Ground Floor
Jun 23 @ 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm
Jun
24
Wed
Registration Open @ Entrance Hall, Ground Floor
Jun 24 @ 8:00 am – 6:00 pm
Advocacy and Communications SC Workshop: Copyright Reform for Text and Data Mining @ Senate/Jessel, First Floor
Jun 24 @ 9:00 am – 12:00 pm

Advocacy and Communications SC Workshop: Copyright Reform for Text and Data Mining

Abstract

Copyright is slowly adjusting to the digital landscape. The European Commission is currently pursuing a programme of copyright reform that is expected to result in an updated European Union-wide copyright directive. In this context, it is important for libraries and educational institutions to advocate for knowledge-friendly flexibilities to copyright law. LIBER is active in this process. 

Text and Data Mining (TDM) will only increase in importance because of its capacity for facilitating through extraction new insights and knowledge from the growing masses of so-called big data, including many academic disciplines. One issue, however, is that the current legal framework in the EU facilitates far from optimal conditions for TDM research.

The workshop provides an overview of the legal framework for copyright in Europe as well as presenting a global perspective, including the latest developments at WIPO (World Intellectual Property Organisation). We will discuss what LIBER is doing to contribute to European copyright reform. In addition, there will be tips on how to undertake an advocacy programme, which will be useful not just for ‘access to knowledge’ issues but more broadly on how to advocate to parliamentarians for any type of change. This will be a lively group participation section of the workshop.

Agenda

Jonas Holm (Stockholm University, Sweden): Copyright Reform for Text and Data Mining

Ben White (British Library, UK): The WIPO (World Intellectual Property Organisation) and the International Context

Ben White (British Library, UK): Copyright and TDM (Text and Data Mining) in the UK

DARIAH Workshop: From Digital Collections to Digital Scholarship: New Takes on Research Support @ Woburn Suite, Ground Floor
Jun 24 @ 9:00 am – 12:00 pm

DARIAH Workshop: From Digital Collections to Digital Scholarship: New Takes on Research Support

Abstract:

Libraries have been serving the information needs of arts and humanities researchers for many years by providing access to physical and digital collections as well as training and guidance in their discovery and use. However, as humanities researchers increasingly use digital methods in their daily work, what do libraries need to do to go beyond this traditional support and respond to these evolving needs?

Initiatives such as DARIAH, the Digital Research Infrastructure for the Arts and Humanities, are committed to enhancing and supporting digitally-enabled research in the arts and humanities across Europe. DARIAH offers a portfolio of services and activities centred around research communities and develops a research infrastructure for sharing and sustaining digital arts and humanities knowledge. What could the role for libraries be in initiatives such as DARIAH?

How can librarians gain a better understanding of what humanities researchers need when interacting with data, creating data, annotating and mining large and complex digital collections? What are the roles for libraries in ensuring that digital outputs from humanities research can be sustained in the longer-term? How can libraries build on their existing strengths to offer valuable expertise for digital Welcomehumanities projects? What other partnerships are needed, e.g. university/faculty IT services? These are just some of the questions to be explored further in the workshop.

The session will provide insights and opportunities for discussion in the following areas:

  • •What is digital research in the humanities? What do arts and humanities researchers need to support their digital scholarship? How can digital research infrastructures and tools assist scholarly enquiry in a new way?
  • What library initiatives already exist to support the use of digital methods in humanities research? How can libraries build capacities for digital humanities research?
  • How can libraries contribute to the education and training of digital humanities students and researchers? What opportunities do the digital humanities offer for outreach beyond campus (Public History, Applied Humanities, etc.)?

Audience: This workshop intends to bring together researchers, from a range of arts and humanities disciplines, who use digital methods in their everyday work, together with library and information professionals, including library managers, liaison and subject librarians, metadata experts, digital library specialists and research data managers.

Outcomes: Increase awareness and understanding of the role of libraries in digital humanities research. Explore the possibility of developing a LIBER-DARIAH working group on digital humanities and libraries.

Programme

Welcome

Lorna Hughes: Fashionably Late or Missed the Party? Gatecrashing the Digital Humanities for Libraries

Mike Mertens: Introducing DARIAH

Scaling Collaboration in the Digital Humanities

James Baker: Digital Research at the British Library Collaborating with internal and external audiences

Digital Research at the British Library

Saskia Scheltjens: Digital Humanities in the Library

 

 

Digital Collections Workshop: Digitisation of Newspapers in European Libraries @ Court Room, First Floor
Jun 24 @ 9:00 am – 12:00 pm

Digital Collections Workshop: Digitisation of Newspapers in European Libraries

Abstract

The Europeana newspaper project demonstrated the many activities of digitisation in European libraries. Recent developments in Finland, Denmark and Norway are aiming at large scale digitisation and at securing access to collections of active, copyright-protected newspapers. The Digital Collections Working Group has engaged the National Library of Norway to survey the state of these developments in Europe. The results of the survey and best practice examples will be presented at the workshop.

Programme 

Andreas Degkwitz: Welcome and the Mission of the Working Group

Roger Josevold: Report and Results of the Survey – Current newspapers digitisation in Norway

Torsten Johansson: Current newspapers digitisation in Sweden

Tonny Skovgard Jensen: Current newspapers digitisation in Denmark

Jukka  Kervinen: Current newspapers digitisation in Finland

Bruno Sagna (Bibliothèque Nationale de France): Copyright regulations and legal framework for running newspapers digitisation in France

 

 

 

 

 

LIBER Digital Cultural Heritage Forum Workshop: State of the Art in Image Recognition @ Bedford Room G37, Ground Floor
Jun 24 @ 9:00 am – 12:00 pm

LIBER Digital Cultural Heritage Forum Workshop: State of the Art in Image Recognition

Abstract

This workshop will explore why the use of images for research purposes has not yet received as much attention from librarians as full text searching. This may be to do with copyright issues and/or the limitations that exist in indexing and searching visual data, or indeed the difficulties with images in applying tools for classification and recognition.

Potentially, content-based image searching has the huge advantage that the user is not dependent on metadata or cataloguing data to discover a particular image. Traditionally, content-based image comparison checks data on a pixel-bypixel basis and searches a database or the Internet for like images (using technology to mirror and allowing for fuzziness). Subsequently, the need for object recognition in content-based image retrieval has been recognised and developed.

In this workshop we will explore the state of the art in image recognition, especially in terms of searching data, and comparing and classifying images.

Programme

Giuseppe Amato: Using image recognition for cultural heritage. The EAGLE project experience

Thomas Wolf: Image recognition and image similarity: A different approach for accessing large scale digital collections

Matilde Malaspina: Image recognition in the 15cBOOKTRADE project

Matthieu Bonicel : Using images in Digital humanities: current projects at BnF and in Biblissima

Vlad Atanasiu: Document and library visualization

OpenAire Gold Open Access Pilot Workshop @ Deller Hall, Basement
Jun 24 @ 9:00 am – 12:00 pm

OpenAire Gold Open Access Pilot Workshop: Open Access Publishing Models and APC Workflows

Abstract

This workshop will present the progress of the LIBER-led, OpenAIRE2020 Gold Open Access Pilot and discuss the Pilot’s goals, challenges and working procedures.

The EC Gold OA Pilot began recently by establishing collaboration agreements between a number of institutions in different countries and OpenAIRE regions. LIBER recognises the variety of publishing landscapes across Europe and wants to explore the possibility of international alignment in respect of institutional best practice in OA publishing management.

The workshop will review the current OA publishing models in use at the institutional level. It will also explore the potential benefits of introducing more transparency to the reporting of institutional APC expenses. There will be a special emphasis on the opportunities for libraries that could flow from decentralised management of the OpenAIRE2010 Gold OA Fund, in particular, learning more about researchers’ publishing behaviour in order to better inform them of the various publishing choices they face.

Agenda

Pablo de Castro: The EC FP7 Post-Grant Gold Open Access Pilot: An Introduction

The EC Gold OA Pilot & the Miscellaneous European Gold OA Funding Landscape

The EC Gold OA Pilot & the Netherlands European Gold OA Funding Landscape

Request for Funding: Post-grant FP7 publications

 

Pablo de Castro: The EC FP7 Post-Grant Gold Open Access Pilot: Dissemination Strategies

Valerie McCutcheon: Open Access – Funders and the Research Excellence Framework

Pablo de Castro: Publishers and the EC FP7 Post-Grant Gold Open Access Pilot

Scholarly Communication Research Infrastructures SC Workshop: Libraries and research data: Towards a new leadership role, Part 2 @ Chancellor’s Hall, First Floor
Jun 24 @ 9:00 am – 12:00 pm

Libraries and research data: Towards a new leadership role

Abstract

Several institutions are stepping up their capacity for training and support for research data management. In this workshop we will examine some of their experiences in this area, surveying the types of support services that are needed, and the various ways in which libraries are implementing them. We will demonstrate the new training that is being provided, and how this is being embedded into existing provision, as well as the role played by data interviews understanding researchers’ workflows and needs.

In most cases the starting point is university policy on research data management, which provides a framework for good data management practices. In addition, research funders increasingly require researchers to provide information as part of their funding proposals on how they will manage research data for their projects. In order to help researchers with these tasks, several forms of support are being developed by facilitators within the university. However, there remains a gap between policy and practice, between ideals and their implementation. The goal of this workshop is to provide practical suggestions, concrete ideas, and best practices to fill this gap.

In Part One (Tuesday 23 June), we will look at RDM policies and the forms of support they are stimulating. General policies are often sparse in detail; disciplinary policies, on the other hand often provide more practical suggestions for RDM support.

Issues addressed in Part One:

  • How to link strategy, policies and partnerships for data support?
  • What do institutional and disciplinary RDM policies entail?
  • What forms of support can be derived from these policies?
  • What do research funders expect and how can researchers be supported?
  • Which department is responsible for which forms of support?

Programme

Welcome and introduction to the workshop; Wolfram Horstmann, Birgit Schmidt, University of Göttingen; Rob  Grim, Radboud University

Libraries and research data management: Towards a new leadership role; Wolfram Horstmann

Keynote: Research data management: The researcher’s perspective; Andrew Cox, University of Sheffield

Strategies for data support

1. Research data as a research output, data typology; Mike Mertens, RLUK

2. Data management plans based on digital workflow and role models: A report on a DMP project within the frame of e-Infrastructures Austria

Translating policy into RDM support

3. Translating policy into RDM support at Radboud University; Mijke Jetten, Radboud University

4. Translating policy into RDM support at the University of Edinburgh; Sarah Jones, Digital Curation Centre, University of Glasgow

Hands-on: Translating policy into support, Session chair: Birgit Schmidt.

Facilitators: Paolo Budroni, Rob Grim, Mijke Jetten, Sarah Jones, Maaike Messelink, Mike Mertens, Barbara Sánchez Solís

Participants work in groups and use an institutional or policy from different research areas to set up a support model (3-4 examples altogether).

Tasks for each group:

–              Agree on a rapporteur.

–              Read the policy individually.


 

In Part Two of the workshop (Wednesday 24 June), we will examine experiences with RDM training, i.e. which groups are targeted, what materials used, and what strategies are applied. We will discuss how to move towards providing practical advice for writing research data management plans. Training efforts will certainly help raise awareness, in particular among young researchers. But this does not seem to be sufficient for establishing working relationships that last beyond the event. Therefore, further effort is needed to turn awareness into opportunities for closer collaboration and hands-on training.

Issues addressed in Part Two:

  • Training for RDM: Which are the most effective models, methods, and learning objectives?
  • Writing and reviewing data management plans, data interviews, and more.

 

Programme

Welcome and introduction to the workshop, recap of day 1 Wolfram Horstmann, Birgit Schmidt, University of Göttingen; Rob Grim, Radboud University

Data management training and support for data management plans

1. Opportunities to tune your training through FOSTER Dan North, LIBER

2. Supporting researchers with data management plans: providing guidance, tools and reviewing Sarah Jones, Digital Curation Centre (DCC)

3. Reviewing data management plans for Horizon 2020 grant proposals Mari Elisa Kuusniemi, University of Helsinki

Hands-on:  How to review data management plans?

Session chair: Birgit Schmidt

Facilitators: Paolo Budroni, Rob Grim, Sarah Jones, Dan North, Mijke Jetten, Mari Elisa Kuusniemi, Maaike Messelink, Barbara Sánchez Solís

Participants review data management plans (DMPs) in groups by research area: humanities, social sciences, sciences. All groups agree on a rapporteur and report back about their results.

Tasks for each group:

–              Agree on a rapporteur.

–              Read the DMP individually.

–              Consider the researcher’s perspective, what kind of data is under consideration, how is it collected?

–              Make notes or comments and collect questions for clarification and refinement of the plan.

–              Discuss the main points and make summary.

In addition, please come up with one recommendation on how LIBER could help to strengthen the role of libraries in this activity area.

Outcomes & next steps

Wolfram Horstmann, all rapporteurs and facilitators

Each group has 5 minutes to report their results to the plenary including one recommended next step.


 

SPARC Europe Workshop: Open Access Policy and Training in Europe @ Room 349, Third Floor
Jun 24 @ 9:00 am – 10:30 am

SPARC Europe Workshop: Open Access Policy and Training in Europe

Abstract

The workshop will bring you up to date on two important EUfunded projects currently underway. One is FOSTER (Foster Open Science Training for European Research), a project focused on providing or enabling training courses on all aspects of Open Science. We will report on the courses that have taken place, those still to come, and on the online training materials that the project is creating. The other is PASTEUR4OA (OA Policy Alignment Strategies for European Union Research), which is focused on OA policy. We will report on the policy analysis work that the project has carried out, including the criteria that make a policy most effective, will introduce the new, revamped ROARMAP policy registry, and talk about the project events that are being planned for policymakers.

Please note: The workshop will run for approximately 1.5 hours. In the second half of the morning session we will be hosting a meeting for SPARC Europe members to update them on what SPARC Europe has been doing and its plans for the next period. 

SPARCEurope_Workshop

Open Access policies – policy effectiveness

Ball FOSTER report Jun 2015

The Open Access Button

COFFEE BREAK @ MacMillan Hall, Ground Floor
Jun 24 @ 10:30 am – 11:00 am
Opening Ceremony @ Beveridge Hall, Ground Floor
Jun 24 @ 1:00 pm – 1:30 pm
  • Welcome From:
    Professor Sir Adrian Smith • Vice Chancellor, University of London
    Dr Paul Ayris • Director of Library Services, UCL
  • Reply By:
    Ms Kristiina Hormia-Poutanen • President of LIBER
  • Opening of Meeting of Participants
Opening Keynote: Science and the Library in the 21st Century @ Beveridge Hall, Ground Floor
Jun 24 @ 1:30 pm – 2:15 pm

Sir Mark Walport: Chief Scientific Adviser to HM Government and Head of Government Office for Science, UK

Science and the Library in the 21st Century

What is a library in the 21st century? The role of a library is to communicate knowledge, and knowledge is power. New models of doing and publishing science will inevitably alter how results and supporting data are stored and disseminated. Sir Mark Walport will discuss how libraries can work to maximise the distribution of knowledge, while protecting the intellectual property of its authors.

Sir Mark Walport (FRS FMedSci) is the Chief Scientific Adviser to HM Government and Head of the Government Office for Science.

Previously, Sir Mark was Director of the Wellcome Trust, which is a global charitable foundation dedicated to achieving extraordinary improvements in human and animal health by supporting the brightest minds. Before joining the Trust he was Professor of Medicine and Head of the Division of Medicine at Imperial College London.

He is Co-Chair of the Prime Minister’s Council for Science and Technology and has been a member of this since 2004. He has also been a member of the India UK CEO Forum, the UK India Round Table and the advisory board of Infrastructure UK and a non-executive member of the Office for Strategic Coordination of Health Research. He is a member of a number of international advisory bodies.

He has undertaken independent reviews for the UK Government on the use and sharing of personal information in the public and private sectors: ‘Data Sharing Review’ (2009); and secondary education: ‘Science and Mathematics: Secondary Education for the 21st Century’ (2010).

He received a knighthood in the 2009 New Year Honours List for services to medical research and was elected as Fellow of The Royal Society in 2011.

Science and the Library in the 21st Century  

Plenary Session:- Open Science: From Vision to Action @ Beveridge Hall, Ground Floor
Jun 24 @ 2:15 pm – 3:00 pm

INVITED SPEAKER: Dr Jean-Claude Burgelman: Head of Unit Science Policy and Foresight, DG RTD, European Commission, Belgium

Open Science: From Vision to Action

What did we learn from the consultation and stakeholder discussions? What kind of policy intervention is suggested? What priorities does this mean for the EC?

Jean-Claude Burgelman is presently Head of Unit Science Policy, Foresight and Data in DG RTD. He joined the European Commission in 1999 as a Visiting Scientist in the Joint Research Centre (the Institute of Prospective Technological Studies – IPTS), where he became Head of the Information Society Unit in 2005. In January 2008, he moved to the Bureau of European Policy Advisers (attached to the President of the EC) as adviser for innovation policy. On 1 October 2008, he joined DG RTD, as adviser and then Head of Unit in charge of top level advisory boards like the European Research and Innovation Area Board, the Innovation for Growth Group and the European Forum for Forward Looking Activities.

Until 2000 he was Professor of Communication Technology Policy at the Free University of Brussels, as well as Director of the Centre for Studies on Media, Information and Telecommunications, and involved in science and technology assessment. He has been Visiting Professor at the University of Antwerp, the European College of Bruges and the University of South Africa and sits on several academic journals. He chaired the World Economic Forum’s Global Agenda Council on Innovation and was a member of its Science Advisory Committee.

Open Science: from vision to action

Discussion
Jun 24 @ 2:45 pm – 3:00 pm
COFFEE BREAK @ MacMillan Hall/Crush Hall, Ground Floor
Jun 24 @ 3:00 pm – 3:30 pm
Session 1: Monitoring Open Access @ Beveridge Hall, Ground Floor
Jun 24 @ 3:30 pm – 4:30 pm

1.1 Thoughts on Work-in-Progress Crowdsourcing Metrics for Digital Collections

Tuula Pääkkönen, The National Library of Finland

In The National Library of Finland (NLF) there are millions of digitised newspaper and journal pages, which are openly available via the public website (http://digi.kansalliskirjasto.fi). To serve users better, the user interface was completely overhauled last year with the major aim of introducing crowdsourcing features, for example, by giving end users the opportunity to create digital clippings and personal scrapbook from the digital collections. But how can you know whether crowdsourcing has had an impact? How many of the crowdsourcing functionalities have been used so far? Did crowdsourcing work?

In this paper the statistics and metrics of a recent crowdsourcing effort are analysed across the different digitised material types (newspapers, journals, ephemera). The user given subjects, categories and keywords are analysed to see which topics are the most appealing. Some notable public uses of crowdsourced article clippings are highlighted. The metrics give us indications on how end users, through their own interests, are investigating and using the digital collections. The suggested metrics therefore illustrate the versatility of information needs from citizen science to research purposes.

By analysing user patterns, we can respond to the new user needs by small changes to accommodate the most active users while still making the service more approachable to those who are trying the functionalities for the first time. Participation in annotation can enrich materials in unexpected ways and can possibly pave the way for opportunities for using crowdsourcing more in research contexts, too. This creates greater scope for the goals of open science as source data is available, making it possible for researchers to reach out to the general public for help. In the long term, utilising text mining methods, for example, can allow these different end user segments to achieve more.

Based on our initial experience, we feel that crowdsourcing gives an opportunity for a library to get closer to the user base and get insight into the numerous opportunities digitised content provides for them and for the library. Gathering the first prototype qualitative and quantitative metrics for this particular crowdsourcing case gives information on how to improve both the service and the metrics further so that they can give valid information for decision-making.

Tuula Pääkkönen works in The National Library of Finland’s Centre of Preservation and Digitisation as an Information Systems Specialist. Her work includes the development of some of the tools to support digitisation efforts, technical specification and project work for the http://digi.kansalliskirjasto.fi service. She is also part of a Digital Humanities research team at the Centre. Before coming to NLF she worked on software systems, concepting, specifying and development, in industry for over sixteen years.

1.1 Thoughts on Work-in-Progress Crowdsourcing Metrics for Digital Collections

1. 2 Open APC Data in Germany

Dirk Pieper, Bielefeld University Library, Germany; dirk.pieper@uni-bielefeld.de

In 2014 the German Research Foundation extended the ‘Open Access Publishing Programme’, which supports universities in building a stable infrastructure for financing article processing charges (APC) for Open Access publications, to 2020. Thirtytwo universities have been funded so far. German research organisations like the Max Planck Society, the Helmholtz Association and the Leibniz Association have built up similar structures to foster APC-financed open access publications. Although the German Research Foundation excluded the funding of hybrid publications from the very beginning of its programme in 2009, there is a current debate about external and internal costs for handling APCs and about the transparency of publication costs within universities and research organisations similar to the discussion in the UK.

With the support of the DINI Working Group on ‘Electronic Publishing’, Bielefeld University Library initialised the aggregation of APC data in Germany on GitHub (https:// github.com/OpenAPC/openapc-de). As at February 2015, ten universities and research organisations have contributed their data. Currently, the normalised dataset releases information on about 1,600 articles, with a total expenditure of about €2,000,000.

The paper will explain the use of Open Science workflows for aggregation, use and reuse of APC data (GitHub, archiving via GitLab entity of Bielefeld UL), which include the automatic enrichment and disambiguation of data like journal titles and publisher names, version histories, etc. The project is also based on the outcomes of the international rOpenSci and LibreCat communities. Even at this early stage, the first analysis and data visualisations provide some interesting information about the APC market in Germany.

Dirk Pieper is currently Deputy Head and Head of the Media Department at Bielefeld University Library. He holds a degree in political science and economics from Hamburg University and has been heavily involved in several Open Access projects (e.g. Bielefeld Academic Search Engine, base-search.net) and the APC management at Bielefeld University since 2004. He is also a member of several national and international boards and initiatives like the Committee for Acquisitions and Collection Development of the German Library Association, Efficiency and Standards for Article Charges (ESAC) and the EBSCO European Academic Advisory Board.

1.2 Dirk Pieper- Open APC Data in Germany

Session 2: Developing Infrastructure @ Senate Room, First Floor
Jun 24 @ 3:30 pm – 4:30 pm

2.1 The Organisational and Technical Aspectsof Slovenian Open Access Infrastructure

Milan Ojsteršek; University of Maribor, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Slovenia; milan.ojstersek@um.si

A national network of open access repositories increases the visibility and impact of national research activities and enables faster knowledge transfer and exploitation of research results. It provides additional services for users such as federated search across all involved repositories and permanent storage of research publications and research data. The presentation will discuss organisational and technical aspects of establishing a Slovenian open access infrastructure. The infrastructure consists of Slovenian universities’ repositories, a repository for research organisations and a national portal that aggregates content from the repositories and other Slovenian archives (dLib.si, VideoLectures.NET, digital library of Ministry of Defence, Social Science data archive and ScieVie repository). The national portal ‘openscience.si’ provides a common search engine, recommendations for similar publications, and similar text detection. The main advantages of the Slovenian infrastructure by comparison with other well-known European national open access infrastructures are: the use of software for plagiarism detection during the process of submitting electronic theses, dissertations and research publications; the use of a central recommender system within the national portal that provides recommendations across all repositories; the integration of universities’ repositories with their information and authentication systems, i.e. with the ARNES authentication and authorisation infrastructure (AAI), the national bibliographic catalogue COBISS.SI, the national current research information system SICRIS and the national portal; the availability of repositories from mobile applications for Android, Windows Phone, and iOS devices; and the usage of new features regarding repositories that have not been used within other well-known open source repository software (Dspace, Eprints, Fedora…). These features are mentor statistics, automatic document segmentation and the normalisation of authors using the CONOR.SI normative database.

As part of the setting up of the national open access infrastructure, rules and processes for the mandatory submission of electronic theses, dissertations, research publications and research data were defined. A Linked Open Data (LOD) OpenScience.si dataset is available in order to promote and facilitate the reuse of metadata by other libraries and communities.

Milan Ojsteršek received a PhD in Computer Science from the University of Maribor in 1994. He is Head of the Laboratory for Heterogeneous Computer Systems in the Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Maribor. His research focuses on heterogeneous computing systems, digital libraries, the semantic web, and service-oriented architecture.

2.1 The Organisational and Technical Aspectsof Slovenian Open Access Infrastructure

2.2 Academica: A New Quality in Interlibrary Loan Systems

Katarzyna Slaska Ojsteršek, National Library of Poland, Poland; k.slaska@bn.org.pl

The paper presents the National Library of Poland’s new project: the Digital Lending Library of Scientific Publications ACADEMICA (https://academica.edu.pl), prepared and implemented in 2012–14 in co-operation with the Scientific and Academic Computer Network. The aim of this innovative project was to introduce a new quality to the interlibrary loan system by replacing the traditional form of lending, i.e. sending paper copies by mail, with digital lending of the publications. Users of the portal, which was launched and officially opened at the beginning of December 2014, have access to over 250,000 electronic scientific publications within copyright through dedicated terminals located in scientific and public libraries throughout the country as well as to over 300,000 public domain and licensed publications. Readers using the ACADEMICA system are registered by means of library cards. Sharing of scientific publications is organised in accordance with the provisions of the Act on Copyright and Related Rights, and the works themselves are subject to copying and printing limits. Because of legal restrictions and the rules for interlibrary loans, the ACADEMICA system only permits one user at a time within the territory of Poland to have access to the publication, as in the case of traditional library loans. A booking system was therefore implemented in the ACADEMICA library so that readers can schedule their work at terminals in a selected library. Public domain and open access publications as well as those obtained under licence are available without limits. The paper also presents statistics of usage of the ACADEMICA system in libraries which signed contracts with the National Library.

Katarzyna Ślaska holds a Master’s degree in Library and Information Science from the University of Warsaw. She has worked in the Early Printed Books Department in the National Library of Poland from 1988. She has had many years’ experience in the field of commercial business-to-business publishing and the management of databases, and was able to transfer this experience and the lessons learned to library activity. From 2000 to 2006 she was head of the library in the Institute of English Studies in the University of Warsaw. In 2006 she became Digital Librarian in the National Library of Poland, and Deputy Director in August 2007. She is responsible for digitisation, born digital documents, information services and education in the National Library of Poland and is in charge of a number of digitisation projects.

2.2 Academica- A New Quality in Interlibrary Loan Systems

Session 3: Data Exploitation and Reuse @ Court Room, First Floor
Jun 24 @ 3:30 pm – 4:30 pm

3.1 Is Europe Falling Behind in Data Mining? Copyright Law’s Impact on Data Mining in Academic Research

Christian Handke, The Erasmus University, The Netherlands
Lucie Guibault and Joan Josep Vallbé, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands

This paper discusses how different levels of copyright protection affect the text and data mining (TDM) performance of academic researchers in the main research areas.

Copyright protection is determined at a national level. The scope of rights and exceptions varies per country: in some countries, exceptions expressly allow TDM to take place, while in others such activities are restricted. In most countries, the law is unclear. Statutory copyright exceptions, where they exist, can be interpreted in different ways. The assessment of the lawfulness of TDM falls back on the judgment of the researcher. Depending on the knowledge or perception of the law, TDM may be deemed allowed, probably allowed, probably not allowed or restricted. This paper assesses the consequences of the different levels of copyright protection on TDM activities.

Our aim was to explain the comparative variation in research output about data mining. For this, we collected data from Thomson Reuter’s Web of Science. To identify the research output of interest, we extracted all the published research from authors residing in the 31 largest national economies that contained the expression ‘data mining’ in the extended abstract, including 14 EU member states, for the years 1992 to 2014. As a control for the total research output of the respective countries, our dependent variable was the quotient between this absolute academic TDM output and the total research output from these countries. Our unit of analysis was the country-year proportion of TDM research output.

Other control variables included the rule of law (as reported by the World Bank), dealing with the level of enforcement of copyright, and the size and wealth of countries.

To estimate the effect of copyright law on the share of TDM in total research output, we fitted a multilevel linear regression model with varying intercept for country and year.

The data illustrate the rapid growth of TDM-related articles in total research output across all countries.We find a highly significant effect of copyright law: the more restrictive copyright law in most European countries is associated with a significantly lower share of TDM output. Data mining makes up a higher share of total research output in countries with more permissive copyright laws. Some Asian countries in particular over-perform in terms of their TDM research output. What is more, the share of TDM in total research output grows more rapidly in the less restrictive countries.

Lucie Guibault is Associate Professor at the Institute for Information Law in the University of Amsterdam (UvA). She studied law at the Université de Montréal (Canada) and in 2002 she receivedher doctorate from the University of Amsterdam, where she defended her thesis on ‘Copyright Limitations and Contracts: An Analysis of the Contractual Overridability of Limitations on Copyright’. She specialises in international and comparative copyright and intellectual property law, and has carried out research for the European Commission, Dutch ministries, UNESCO and the Council of Europe. Her main areas of interest include copyright and related rights in the information society, open content licensing, collective rights management, limitations and exceptions in copyright, and author’s contract law, She was coauthor of the Report of the Expert Group on Standardisation in the Area of Innovation and Technological Development, Notably in the Field of Text and Data Mining, written for the Directorate- General Research and Innovation, European Commission.

3.1 Is Europe Falling Behind in Data Mining

 

3.2 Can Computational Knowledge Discovery Tools Speed up Scientific Discovery?

Pinar Öztürk and Erwin Marsi, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway
Natalia Manola, University of Athens, Greece

The inherent nature of environmental systems calls for interdisciplinary and collaborative research, which is in contrast with the traditional organisation of research around discipline-centric silos. The disconnectedness between marine biology, marine chemistry, socio-economics, etc. is the main barrier slowing down the speed of discovery of new knowledge about complex problems such as the impacts of climate change on nature and society. The main obstacle of scientific advancement in such problems has shifted from production of discipline-centric knowledge to linking together pieces of existing knowledge across disciplines. The management of such a vast body of knowledge is far beyond the capabilities of individual scientists.

Computer tools have so far focused on keyword-based document retrieval while Ocean-Certain(OC), an FP7 project, aims to develop tools for Literature-Based Discovery (LBD) of scientific knowledge about the role of oceans in the export of CO2 to the sediments. LBD is used in biomedicine but use of LBD in earth science is virtually unexplored. The principal idea is that using text mining, computers can machine-read huge amounts of literature, extract the fertile pieces of knowledge (in the form of entities, events and relations) and link them together to identify potential gaps and missing links in the published work, while inferring new knowledge. The ongoing work also investigates the coherence among the published results on a particular question, e.g., whether the growth of phytoplankton leads to better CO2 export. The tool aims to retrieve instances of positive and negative answers, whose ratio would indicate the degree of uncertainty in the collective knowledge. The online collaborative platform will ultimately allow researchers to see one another’s questions and the system responses, as well as giving feedback on which of the system inferred hypotheses seem plausible to pursue.

For maximum benefit to research communities the platform must overcome today’s legal and technical barriers. These are mostly publisher-imposed obstacles, which increase (i) the uncertainty for the final users and low uptake due to unclear licensing issues, thus influencing the ability for scientific reproducibility; (ii) technological complexity that requires going through licensing issues for constant verification; and (iii) hidden costs from the fact that many researchers need to repeat the same text mining processes in their own environment to nonshared content.

Pinar Öztürk is Associate Professor in the Department of Computer and Information Science in the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU). She received her PhD from the Department of Computer and Information Science at NTNU. Her focus is artificial intelligence methods including rule and model-based methods and machine learning. She applies AI methods for distributed decision-making, ontology building and knowledge extraction from text. She was project leader and worked on various small and larger projects funded by the Norwegian Research Council, EU and the industry. Currently, she is leading a work package in the Smart Power Grid project (funded by Utilities) and a task in the EU funded OCEAN-CERTAIN project (since November 2013) that focuses on text mining in Climate Science.
3.2 Can Computational Knowledge Discovery Tools Speed up Scientific Discovery

Session 4: Metrics @ Woburn Suite (22/26)
Jun 24 @ 3:30 pm – 4:30 pm

Evidence that data sharing increases citation impact

Bertil F. Dorch
University Library of Southern Denmark, Denmark; bfd@bib.sdu.dk

Demands for Data Management Plans are now common from both national, international and private research funders and agencies, and as infrastructures and policies are arising aiming at both archiving, structuring and distributing research data resulting from scholarly ventures within practically all fields of science. This is probably both a result of increased focus on issues related to Responsible Conduct of Research, as well as of the Open Science agenda. Also, as individual researchers and research are increasingly being evaluated and funded according to quantitative measures, e.g. bibliometrics and similar, it is evermore relevant to ask whether a Citation Advantage related to the activity of linking exists, i.e. whether sharing data leads to increased impact with respect to citations, similar to the postulated Citation Advantage related to Open Access.

In this paper we present evidence of the existence of a Citation Advantage related to linking to data, using the field of astronomy as a case. Using simple measures based on publication and citation data from NASA’s Astrophysics Data System, I find that the Citation Advantage presently amounts to certain peer reviewed research articles with links to research data receiving on the average significantly more citations per paper per year, than the corresponding research articles without links to data. The results presented here is a further development of a previously unpublished work (Dorch 2012, working paper). Additionally, similar studies by other authors show a cumulative effect after several years amounting to up to 20%. Hence, a Data Sharing Citation Advantage seems inevitable, lending further argument to the cause of Open Science as well as indications as to how libraries may develop research support services related to improving conditions for Open Science.

4.1 Evidence that Data Sharing Increases Citation Impact

Altmetrics in Action: Using Metrics Tools to Extend Library Research Support Services

Natalia Madjarevic1, Scott Taylor2
1Altmetric; 2University of Manchester; natalia@altmetric.com, Scott.Taylor@manchester.ac.uk

Institutions and researchers are facing increasing pressures from management, funders, and governmental reviews to demonstrate the impact and engagement their research is achieving beyond academia. Traditional metrics such as citation counts and the impact factor provide little evidence or context to support this, and institutions are now looking to other tools to help them demonstrate the value of their academic output.

Alternative metrics, or ‘altmetrics’, are becoming an increasingly widespread tool for gathering this insight, and it is important that all stakeholders within an institution understand how they can best evolve strategy and working practice to maximise the advantages that such initiatives can provide.

In this session Scott Taylor, Research Services Librarian at the University of Manchester, will discuss their motivations for incorporating altmetrics into their workflows across the institution and how this was integrated with existing Library research support and bibliometrics services. We’ll look at the monitoring and reporting that takes place at the author, group, departmental and institutional level, and Scott will share his experiences of introducing management, faculty and professional staff to the Altmetric for Institutions platform.

The session will offer guidance on how the data can be used effectively to develop a better understanding of how research published by your institution is being received and put into practice, and is ideal for anyone who is keen to learn about new ways of tracking and reporting on engagement.

4.2 Altmetrics in Action- Using Metrics Tools to Extend Library Support Services

Strategy Pub (prior registration required) @ Deller Hall, Basement
Jun 24 @ 4:30 pm – 5:30 pm
Jun
25
Thu
Registration Open @ Entrance Hall, Ground Floor
Jun 25 @ 8:00 am – 6:00 pm
Session 5: New Models for Libraries @ Beveridge Hall, Ground Floor
Jun 25 @ 9:00 am – 10:30 am

5.1 Working towards Open Access for Monographs – A Pilot with UK Universities

Eelco Ferwerda, OAPEN Foundation, The Netherlands

At the 2014 Annual Conference, a paper presented the development and rationale of the OAPEN deposit service for Open Access monographs. This paper will focus on the practical implementation of these services in the context of a pilot project that was launched in September in the UK by OAPEN Foundation and JISC Collections, in close collaboration with several universities, university libraries and university presses.

Building on use cases, the pilot project will set up and test central services designed to support and encourage the production and dissemination of high-quality OA scholarly monographs. It focuses on four key areas that are particularly relevant to those involved in scholarly communication within the university library: quality assurance; aggregation and deposit; dissemination and discovery; and management information. The project is due to report in September/October 2015.

This session offers delegates an early view of the services that are being developed and the opportunity to comment on them and to discuss preliminary findings. Delegates will be informed about the state of Open Access for monographs, the potential for centralised services supporting OA monographs, and the relevance of these services for their institutes.

Eelco Ferwerda is Director of OAPEN, a foundation dedicated to OA books. He has been active in the area of Open Access for monographs since 2008, when he started managing OAPEN as EU co-funded project with six European university presses. Before that he worked as Publisher of digital publications at Amsterdam University Press. Before joining AUP in 2002, he worked in various new media subsidiaries at the former Dutch newspaper publisher PCM, lastly as Manager Business Development for PCM Interactive Media. In 2013, he organised a conference about OA monographs in the Humanities and Social Sciences, together with Caren Milloy of JISC Collections and hosted by the British Library. He is a member of the Board of Directors of the Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association (OASPA). He is co-founder of the Association of European University Presses (AEUP, 2010) and of the Directory of Open Access Books (DOAB), which he launched with Lars Björnshauge in 2012.

5.1 Working towards Open Access for Monographs – A Pilot with UK Universities

5.2 A Library Infrastructure for the Practices of Scholarly Communication

Sofie Wennström, Stockholm University, Sweden

Stockholm University Press, founded in 2014, will publish its first Open Access books in early 2015, and one academic journal is already up and running. This presentation will cover the current challenges for Stockholm University Press, how we plan to move forward in the immediate future, and last but not least outline plans for further developments.

As a new player in the arena of scholarly communication, with ambitions to reach the highest international level, the competition is stiff. The innovative working model with exchange of ideas and best practices through strategic international partnerships with other university presses will build a sustainable model for publication of peer-reviewed books and journals. The aim is to create more options for researchers at the university to communicate their results to a wider audience.

The practice of running the press raises a number of questions: how does the library provide a reliable infrastructure worthy of academic exchange of ideas on an international level; how do we make the review process count in relation to evaluation methods of scholarly work; how do we provide a publishing service that benefits the researchers to a greater extent in comparison with traditional models; and how can the library act as a centre of excellence collecting knowledge about scholarly communication in relation to the publishing entity?

Stockholm University Press is now implementing an online infrastructure for a peer-review process for quality control for Open Access monographs and book chapters. The quality control workflow has been developed in close collaboration with active scholars as well as a strategic partner, a company called Ubiquity Press. The evaluation process managed by the editorial teams of researchers should be rigorous, transparent, efficient, and follow international guidelines on publication ethics. We believe that the researcher-led publishing approach will lead to more usage, more citations and more recognition for the work done by scholars. not only in the number of papers published but also through recognition of the peer-review process by using the bibliometrics created.

Sofie Wennström has a Bachelor’s Degree in Education from Stockholm University, and is working as a Researcher in the Department of Quality in Stockholm University Library. She has over 10 years’ experience of working at one of the largest academic publishers in the world, and brings that know-how to the Library to develop Stockholm University Press and the ibrary services further as a centre of excellence for scholarly communication.

5.2 A Library Infrastructure for the Practices of Scholarly Communication

5.3 bwFDM Communities – A Research Data Management Initiative in the
State of Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany

Karlheinz Pappenberger, University of Konstanz, Germany

On 29 July 2014, the Ministry of Science, Research and the Arts for Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany launched an e-science initiative to build up a powerful, efficient and innovative information infrastructure for all universities, research institutions and universities of applied science in south-west Germany. With an overall budget of €3.7 million, action plans in five areas, licensing, digitisation, research data management, open access and virtual research environments will be worked out over the coming years.

Within this framework an 18 month project was launched at the beginning of 2014 – ending on 30 June 2015 – to evaluate the needs of services and the support that libraries and IT service centres should offer researchers in the area of research data management. In this ‘bwFDM communities’ project, full-time key project staff have been established at all nine universities in the county (Freiburg, Heidelberg, Hohenheim, Karlsruhe, Konstanz, Mannheim, Stuttgart, Tübingen and Ulm; among them nationally and internationally highly-ranked universities). The task of the key project staff is to identity the concrete needs and requirements of all research groups working with research data (in a broad sense including all areas of science, social science and humanities) at each of the nine universities, as well as possible solutions by conducting semi-structured personal interviews and documented them in the form of user stories. More than 650 interviews have been conducted and more than 1,200 user stories documenting, showing the wide range of needs and wishes articulated by researchers. On this basis issues of importance and requirements will be identified, categorised and finalised into recommendations for concrete action plans. The final report to the Ministry is planned to be a starting point for a comprehensive research data management strategy for the State of Baden-Wuerttemberg.

The presentation will give an overview of the project results, and will highlight the roles libraries and IT service centres are expected to play from the researcher´s point of view.

Karlheinz Pappenberger has been Subject Librarian for Economics and Statistics in Communication, Information, Media Centre (KIM) Library Services at the University of Konstanz, Germany, since 1996. For a number of years, he has also specialised in research data management and usage statistics for electronic library services at the University of Konstanz. He has been involved in several third party-funded national and European projects all in the area of open access and research data management (information platform open-access.net; Open-Access Subject Repositories; OpenAIRE; OpenAIREplus; Open-Access, Publishing; MovebankVRE; bwFDM). He works within the open access group in the University of Konstanz Library, dealing with the institutional repository and promoting publishing open access and hosting open access journals at the University. He is member of the NEREUS European library network working on services for research data and open access in the field of economics. He studied Economics and Political Science at the University of Regensburg, Germany, and has been Research Assistant in Public Economics at the University of Passau, Germany.

5.3 bwFDM Communities

Session 6: Strategy and Policy @ Senate Room, First Floor
Jun 25 @ 9:00 am – 10:30 am

6.1 Be Careful What You Wish For – Unexpected Policy Consequences

Danny Abigail Kingsley, University of Cambridge, UK

The open access policy landscape in the UK is currently very convoluted and in some cases conflicted. For example, both the Research Councils of UK and Higher Education Funding Council of England have policies requiring open access to research outputs. In the first instance, there is an emphasis on open access publication with block grants to cover the costs; with the latter there is a requirement to have the author’s accepted manuscript in a repository within three months of acceptance if the work is to be eligible for consideration in the 2020 Research Excellence Framework.

As institutions turn their attention to compliance the conflicting policy requirements mean there has been a dilution of the open access message. The role of open access managers has moved from a traditional focus on support and advocacy to a responsibility for enforcing compliance. In some cases the systems in place to manage compliance are working against academic engagement with open access.

It is instructive to look at feedback from the academic community about what they think is required of them, by whom and when. This approach demonstrates how complex the policy landscape has become, where in some cases the academic response has been to disengage completely. This paper will explore some of the challenges faced by the University of Cambridge with implementing compliance solutions, and how these are being addressed.

There are positive aspects of these policy changes, however. Funding compliance has forced traditionally separate administrative centres within institutions to work more closely together. The University of Cambridge has actively pursued interdepartmental collaboration with the appointment of several roles that are shared across the Research Office and Library. In addition, the need to develop compliance systems that sit within existing academic communication practices will potentially increase engagement with open access into the longer term.

Dr Danny Kingsley began in the new role of Head of Scholarly Communication at the University of Cambridge in January 2015. She is responsible for the open access programme with a wider remit of open data and transitioning towards new scholarly communication practices. Danny came to the UK from Australia, and remains a Visiting Fellow of the Australian National Centre for the Public Awareness of Science at the Australian National University. Her research centres on scholarly communication with a specific interest in open access, research assessment, peer review, authorship and higher education. She completed her PhD looking at the barriers to opening up access to science publications in 2008. She is a committee member of the Australian Academy of Sciences National Committee for Data in Science. Her previous role was as Executive Officer of the Australian Open Access Support Group, which aims to inform the discussions around open access at a time of great change in this area. She was responsible for developing the content on the AOASG website including explainers, blogs and general information about the topic. She ran a discussion list and Twitter feed as part of the outreach activities of the group. Prior to this she was Manager, Scholarly Communication and ePublishing, at the Australian National University. She was responsible for developing policies relating to scholarly communication and open access, and rebuilt the DSpace repository prior to its July 2011 relaunch. She also worked as an Associate Lecturer (parttime) in science communication.

6.1 Be Careful What You Wish For

 

6.2 Joint Research Centre’s Open Access Policy

Giacinto Piero Tartaglia, Alessandro Annoni, Anders Frijs-Christensen, Fabrizio Bonato, Per Loekkemyhr and Giuseppe Merlo, European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Italy

Horizon 2020 is taking a big step towards Open Science in Europe. The strategy for a smart, sustainable and inclusive economy underlines the central role of knowledge and innovation in generating growth and addressing the societal challenges of the century. The Communications COM (2012) 392 and 401, COM (2011) 833 and 882 and the C (2012) 4890, set out the action that the Commission is undertaking to improve access to scientific information and to boost the benefits of public investment in research increasing productivity, competitiveness and growth and detail scope and actions for implementation of the open access (OA) policies to the Member States.

As a Commission body, in its focal role in providing scientific advice to policy making, the Joint Research Centre (JRC) must lead by example in providing OA to its publicly-funded research results, optimising the circulation, access to and transfer of scientific knowledge among key stakeholders in European research, such as universities, funding bodies, libraries, firms, governments and policy-makers, society at large. The actions undertaken by the JRC range from the implementation of OA policies to its participation in EU initiatives on how to foster OA, preserve scientific information, enhance the usefulness of scientific results in a pan-European knowledge-shared environment.

The paper describes the JRC experience in implementing OA policy to scientific publications (in force since 1 January 2014), in implementing the Data Policy, adopted in 2014, for granting access to data, datasets, metadata, databases underpinning the scientific publications, and the online dissemination channels. As the JRC is the major resource of in-house models in the Commission, the paper presents its Modelling Inventory Database and Access Services, MIDAS, which allows users to identify suitable models for a particular purpose, to assess the use of these models for impact assessment, policy support and to access related datasets and documents.

The paper also covers tools, e.g. the publication management system, PUBSY, establishing e-workflow and hosting features for ensuring high-quality peer-reviewed papers. The JRC extends the open concept to e-infrastructure (in a EU context) and to the opening of its high-quality large research infrastructure. Equally, the paper addresses the development of Open Science and the JRC initiatives to ensure a coherent understanding of the changing environment at political level.

Giacinto Piero Tartaglia has been leading the Planning, Evaluation and Knowledge Management Unit since January 2014, in order to implement systems for comprehensive knowledge management at JRC, which might be extended to other areas in the Commission. As an MSc in Nuclear Engineering and Physics, PhD in Nuclear Science and Technology, Chartered Engineer, and a member of various professional associations, he has worked in several national and international organisations (e.g. ENEA, FZK, CEA, CERN), on thermo-fluid-dynamics, structural mechanics, nuclear engineering and physics, material properties, energy, before joining the JRC in 1987. He moved from applied research to management positions, responsible for complex and diversified projects/programmes, involving relevant resources, means and firms. In 1987, at the High Flux Reactor division (Petten), he was responsible for irradiation experiments (reactor materials, components) and radioisotopes production, ultimately managing the whole facility. In 1997, he moved to Ispra, where he was responsible for Advanced Materials and Technologies, and then Head of the Management Support Unit, and delegated overall coordinator, of the new Institute for Health and Consumer Protection. In 2002, he was Head of the Nuclear Decommissioning and Waste Management Unit, to eliminate historical liabilities from the site. In 2005, as Head of the Maintenance & Utilities Unit, he developed a strategic plan, upgrading installations, eliminating hazards, to achieve high energy efficiency (20-20-20 policy), thus minimising the site environmental impact.

Joint Research Centres Open Access Policy

 

6.3 ‘Open’ Initiatives in Higher Education Institutions: Towards an Integrated Strategy

Sheila Corrall, University of Pittsburgh, USA
Stephen Pinfield, University of Sheffield, UK

Open approaches in higher education have evolved from open source software, open access to research, and open courseware, to initiatives concerned with infrastructure and process. Open science typifies this broader conception, but can be interpreted differently by stakeholders. Open developments are gaining impetus from bottom-up movements and top-down forces, but practitioner tactics and institutional policies rarely consider openness holistically, aspiring to similar goals without seeing the benefits of a coordinated strategy.

Adopting Boyer’s (1990; 1996) expanded model of scholarship as a set of interlocking activities that includes integration, application, teaching, and public engagement, alongside discovery; and building on the e-Infranet (2012; 2013) survey on open and call for policy integration; we argue that the commonalities and shared benefits of different opens constitute a convincing case for higher education institutions to pursue a unified strategy (Corrall & Pinfield, 2014; 2015), and that by extending their advocacy and policy efforts to additional open types and domains, libraries can strengthen their position as partners and leaders in open science.

Our research aims to describe what an integrated open strategy for a university could look like, addressing both content and process dimensions of strategy formation. Using a multistrand mixed-methods design, we explore policies for open domains from different countries. We sourced our data from institutional websites, using procedures from prior strategy studies (Corrall, 2007; McNicol, 2005), and analysed them using the 5W1H model from journalism and education studies (Why? What? When? Where? Who? How?) as an evaluation framework (Pan & Kosicki, 1993; Patton, 1988). We use the results to elaborate the major components of a coherent open strategy, incorporating themes such as governance, licensing, and funding, and discussing issues such as stakeholders, skills, and culture.

The next phase is a large-scale international survey that will test our framework quantitatively with a more diverse sample. The proposed paper will share findings to date, including our typology of open domains, features of good practice from analysis of atomistic policies, and suggested components and requirements for development of holistic policies. We shall also address the role of strategies and policies in creating capacity and changing behaviour, and the contribution of libraries in promoting open scholarship.

Sheila Corrall joined the School of Information Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh in 2012, following eight years at the University of Sheffield iSchool. She previously worked at the British Library and as director of library and information services at three UK universities. She teaches courses on Academic Libraries, Research Methods, and Academic Culture & Practice. Her research interests include the application of strategic management concepts and tools to library and information work; the changing landscape of open scholarship; collection development in the digital world; and the evolving roles and competencies of library and information specialists. She is a member of the advisory board of Credo Reference and serves on the editorial boards of six international journals.

Stephen Pinfield joined the Information School at the University of Sheffield in 2012, having previously worked as a senior information practitioner in the UK Higher Education sector; latterly as Chief Information Officer at the University of Nottingham with responsibility for a large converged IT and library service supporting Nottingham’s campuses in the UK, China and Malaysia. He has experience of leading a wide range of research and development projects and participating in national policy initiatives, and brings this experience to bear on his research and teaching. His main interests focus on managing and developing information and technology services in organisations, skills development for information professionals, scholarly communication, digital information resources management, ‘openness’, and information-related policies in organisations.

6.3 ‘Open’ Initiatives in Higher Education Institutions

Session 7: Tools & Services @ Court Room, First Floor
Jun 25 @ 9:00 am – 10:30 am

7.1 The Emerging Role of Institutional CRIS in Facilitating Open Scholarship

Anna Clements and Jackie Proven, University of St Andrews, UK

This paper describes the evolution of institutional CRIS (Current Research Information Systems) from their traditional role as a tool managed by the Research Office to manage and assess research towards more widespread uses within institutions, in particular within the Library, to facilitate Open Science.

Open Science or Scholarship is one of the hottest topics around. Organisations and funders from the G8 down stress the importance of openness in driving everything from global innovation through to more accountable governance; not to mention the more direct possibility that non-compliance could result in grant income drying up for individual researchers.

We will focus on the UK, using St Andrews as a detailed example, describing the organisational, procedural and technological responses to this ‘open by default’ agenda, and why and how the Library is taking a leading role in these changes.

We have had a CRIS since 2006, evolving in tandem with the rapidly changing external policies and slower cultural shifts towards more and more open access to research outputs. The CRIS is a tool for managers but increasingly for researchers too. The latter are key to addressing some of the challenges we face as institutions in developing strategies to support Open Scholarship. The CRIS provides a single portal bringing corporate and academic research activity together, reducing duplicate data entry, increasing data quality, identifying authority sources of information and recording complex relationships between researchers, projects, outputs and impact.

Increasingly a CRIS is the primary bibliographic record and a similar role is emerging for research data. The Library has a key role to play in curating, preserving and sharing the metadata and digital objects produced as a result of research undertaken at the Institution. Arguably the Library is also key to bridging the gap between the research process itself and its more traditional end of life curation, archiving and preservation role. In particular with research data management the challenge is to understand sufficiently the common and discipline-specific research processes in order to engage with researchers at the appropriate times and with the appropriate skills and advice.

At St Andrews we are exploring the use of our CRIS to help build these contacts with researchers both with Open Access and Open Data throughout the lifecycle and the paper will report on both the successes achieved and issues encountered.

Anna Clements was appointed Assistant Director of Library Services at  University of St Andrews, to head up the new Digital Research Division created in April 2015. The Division brings together  Open Access & Research Publications Support, Research Data Management, Digital Humanities and Research Computing. There is also a remit to develop Bibliometric and Digital Science support services.

Anna moved to the Library from IT Services in 2013. In IT Services she held posts as  Programme Manager,  Data Architect and Enterprise Architect and was also co-opted to serve as Senior Research Policy Advisor in 2011. Prior to joining the University in 2003,  Anna had over 20 years experience working as a consultant, software developer and project manager designing and building systems for a variety of SMEs,  and UK/ US educational and academic publishers.

Her current role consolidates her skills and expertise in data management, research information management and policy development.  She is a tireless advocate, within the University and (inter)nationally of the basic management information principles of entering data once and using open standards to improve data quality whilst minimizing the data collection burden across the research sector.

Externally,  Anna is Executive for strategy on the euroCRIS Board  (www.eurocris.org) , a member of the Snowball Metrics Steering Committee (www.snowballmetrics.com) and chairs the Pure UK Strategy Group and the CASRAI-UK Data Management Planning Working Group (www.casrai.org)

Jackie Proven is Repository and Open Access Services Manager at the University of St Andrews Library, in the new Digital Research Division created in April 2015. Jackie manages the integration of the University’s Current Research Information System (Pure) with the institutional research repository (https://research-repository.st-andrews. ac.uk), and co-ordinates the University’s central funding for open access. She manages the open access support team, helping researchers to comply with funder mandates and providing advice on copyright, licensing and publisher policies relating to open access.

Jackie is also responsible for development and promotion of new repository services which support scholarly communication and increase the visibility of research outputs. These services include the Library’s Journal Hosting Service which enables academic staff and students to set up their own open access journals. Jackie has been a passionate advocate for open access for over 10 years and worked on a Jisc Digital Repositories Project in 2005–07 which investigated issues around open educational resources. She had experience of developing policies and infrastructure for institutional repositories at two other universities before joining St Andrews in 2010. Jackie is currently working on a Jisc OA Good Practice Project (http://libraryblogs.is.ed.ac.uk/loch), is a member of the Pure Repositories Working Group and the IRUS-UK Community Advisory Group (www.irus.mimas.ac.uk).

7.1 The Emerging Role of Institutional CRIS in Facilitating Open Scholarship

 

7.2 Making Research Data Repositories Visible – The re3data.org Registry

Frank Scholze, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Germany
Heinz Pampel, GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, Germany
Paul Vierkant, Humboldt – Universität zu Berlin, Germany

Researchers require infrastructures that ensure a maximum of accessibility, stability and reliability to facilitate working with and sharing of research data. Such infrastructures are being increasingly summarised under the term Research Data Repositories (RDR). The project re3data.org – Registry of Research Data Repositories – began to index research data repositories in 2012 and offers researchers, funding organisations, libraries and publishers an overview of the heterogeneous research data repository landscape. In December 2014 re3data.org listed more than 1,030 research data repositories, which are described in detail using the re3data.org schema (http://dx.doi.org/10.2312/re3.003). Information icons help researchers to identify easily an adequate repository for the storage and reuse of their data. This talk describes the heterogeneous RDR landscape and presents a typology of institutional, disciplinary, multidisciplinary and project-specific RDR. Further, it outlines the features of re3data. org and it shows current developments for integration into data management planning tools and other services.

By the end of 2015 re3data.org and Databib (Purdue University, USA) will merge their services, which will then be managed under the auspices of DataCite. The aim of this merger is to reduce duplication of effort and to serve the research community better with a single, sustainable registry of research data repositories. The talk will present this organisational development as a best practice example for the development of international research information services.

Frank Scholze has been Director of Library Services at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) since January 2010. KIT is the merger of the University of Karlsruhe and one of the National Research Centers within the Helmholtz Association. He chairs the DINI (German Initiative for Networked Information) working group on electronic publishing and has been involved in a series of digital library projects. He is a member of a number of scientific boards and councils (among them DFG (German Research Foundation), FIZ Karlsruhe, DARIAH-DE and German Classification Society). Before he joined the KIT, he was a Programme Manager at the Ministry of Science Research and the Arts Baden-Württemberg and Head of the Public Services Department at Stuttgart University Library. He holds an MA in Art History and English Literature and a BSc in Library and Information Science.

7.2 Making Research Data Repositories Visible

 

7.3 Playing Games In The Library: Is This Serious? – A French Overview

Cécile Swiatek, ABF, France

Academic Libraries and more generally academic communities, Deans in France, for example, are facing a new trend: playing games in the University. Serious games, alternate reality games are now identified as tools that can help us enhance our services’ visibility: welcoming newcomers, integrating undergraduate students into academic life, leading active learning training in the scope of documentary research training, team building. How can we take advantage of this trend? How can we include and make optimum use of gaming power in order to fulfil our missions, services, activities, and advance staff know-how, skills and profiles?

Are we also supposed to be game designers, scenario writers, game masters? More commonly, can playing games in the library be considered as something serious?

This presentation by a member of the ABF (Association des Bibliothécaires de France) will focus on French academic libraries examples: playing games to create a network of personalised and customisable relationships with the public; playing games to connect staff to library collections and services; playing games to focus the interest of other academic services on the library.

The presentation assembles evidence nationally on the main questions about using games in the library: what can we build in a concrete way from such precise action? Can we/should we establish a complete gaming programme as happens in some other countries, mainly across the Pacific? How is all that related to our missions and priorities; and how is it useful to students, considering them as the apprentices of new rules in a new environment?

Examples will be taken from informal initiatives, e.g. the BnF for its weekly social network enquiries, and academic libraries and library departments/training services initiatives (e.g. mathematical recreations, mystery parties of different scales, treasure hunts, virtual zombie hunts). The obvious link between playing games and some disciplinary cultures (mathematics, robotics) will be underlined, but we will also approach the Humanities and Law, showing how playing can be an elegant and appropriate way to bring users within the library. Some examples will also show how not only playing but also creating games strengthens the links between academic libraries and researchers in the ST fields. The library can be the perfect playground for education and research activities!

Cécile Swiatek represents the French Librarians Association ABF in LIBER and acts as Secretary of the LIBER Reshaping the Research Library Steering Committee. She is in charge of user training, professional development and collections development for Economics, Management, Political Science and Communication Studies at the Université Panthéon-Assas Paris II Academic Library, France. She was previously in charge of collection management, and head of the medical and computer science research sections at BUPMC – Paris6 Academic Library, where she spent over nine years engaged on library collections, sections and services. In 2014 she participated in IFLA Lyon 2014 as a member of the French national committee for Cfibd. She is a member of ADBU and contributes to the Pedagogy and Documentation Commission. She is currently an active member of ABF’s International Commission.

View the story “Playing Games at the Library” on Storify

Session 8: Collaboration with Stakeholders @ Woburn Suite, Ground Floor
Jun 25 @ 9:00 am – 10:30 am

8.1 Collaboration at International, National and Institutional Level is Vital in Fostering Open Science

Kristiina Hormia-Poutanen, National Network Services, The National Library of Finland
Pirjo-Leena Forsström, IT Centre for Research, Finland

Open science and research are a continuum from local to global, from individuals to culture. Models for openness include rich dialogue and wide participation. To ensure replicability and openness, jointly-funded research environments, support services and results will be made widely and equally available to research communities that are guided by agreed policies, principles and contracts of openness.

The focus of the paper is on the Finnish Open Science and Research initiative, and on LIBER’s activities related to Open Science, on the responsibilities and measures through which the various parties can promote openness and collaborate.

To stimulate the research system in Finland towards better competitiveness and higher quality, Finland’s strategy and roadmap for research infrastructures 2014–20 was developed. The research system needs structures and working methods for openness to be extensively harnessed. The roadmap chimes with the Open Science initiative. The research process and research infrastructures will be based on skilled people, in their ability successfully to design and manage the life cycle, and the quality of research results. Science and research will be on a firm footing when results are widely available and reliably preserved. In managing the life cycle of research results, libraries could take an important role. This role includes facilitating increased expertise by focused education, by expertise in metadata, identifiers and other data structures, support for the publication process and in the provision of related services.

Through active advocacy work and EU project management, LIBER has gained a role in the development of research infrastructures and in the discussion of strategic directions for Open Science. It is part of LIBER’s agenda to support its libraries to become central points of contact for researchers and faculties in the area of scholarly publishing and research data management at institutional level for all academic disciplines.

The EU projects have provided LIBER libraries with opportunities to participate in many European projects developing policies related to Open Access, infrastructures and to raise awareness. LIBER has also been active in advocating the need for reform of the legal framework, especially that relating to text and data mining (TDM) and copyright. The Finnish national initiative and the activities of LIBER create mutual added value through dialogue and joint project activities.

Kristiina Hormia-Poutanen is Director of Library Network Services in The National Library of Finland. The department is responsible for the coordination of national library infrastructure services for Finnish libraries, including coordination of consortia activities, library systems management and development, national licensing and development of the digital library for libraries, archives and museums in Finland, as well as the national ontology service. All Finnish universities, universities of applied sciences, many research institutes, all public libraries, Finnish museums and archives are customers of the National Library. In the Finnish research infrastructure evaluations in 2008 and 2013, two of the services in production today were selected for the research infrastructure roadmap: the National Electronic Library, FinELib; and the National Digital Library user interface, Finna (finna.fi). The period for the updated research infrastructure roadmap is 2014–20. She has been President of LIBER since 2014 and was Vice-President 2010–14. She is a member of LIBER’s Steering Committee on Scholarly Communication and Research Infrastructures; and a member of the Europeana Board and the Europeana Executive Committee. She is a member of the Open Science Finland strategy group, the National Digital Library Steering Group and the ICT Management Steering Group for the Ministry of Education and Culture (OpIT), which the Ministry of Education and Culture nominates. She is also member of the Public Interface consortium group and the National Ontology (finto.fi). She is also active internationally in IFLA, ICOLC and eIFL, and in international co-operation on digital library infrastructures, cross-domain cooperation, consortia development issues, licensing and licensing models, open access and open data questions as well as development of easy access methods to electronic resources

8.1 Collaboration and International, National and Institutional Level is Vital in Fostering Open Science

 

8.2 Developing Infrastructure to Support Closer Collaboration of Aggregators with Open Repositories

Petr Knoth and Nancy Pontika, Knowledge Media Institute, The Open University, UK

Over the past five years, the amount of open access content stored in repositories has increased dramatically. This has created new technical and organisational challenges for bringing this content together. The CORE (COnnecting REpositories) project has been dealing with these challenges by aggregating and enriching content from hundreds of open access repositories, increasing the discoverability and reusability of millions of open access outputs via its own search engine and API. The CORE project is now facing the challenge of how to enable content providers to manage content in the aggregation and control the harvesting process as repository managers and library directors often wish to know the details of the content harvested from their repositories and keep certain level of control over it.

In order to improve the quality and transparency of the aggregation process and create a two-way collaboration between the CORE project and the providers of this content, we propose the CORE Dashboard. The aim of this dashboard is to provide an online interface for repository providers offering information about: the content harvested from the repository enabling its management, such as by requesting metadata updates or managing take-down requests, the times and frequency of content harvesting, including all detected technical issues and suggestions for improving the efficiency of harvesting and the quality of metadata, including compliance with existing metadata guidelines, statistics regarding the repository content, such as the distribution of content according to subject fields and types of research outputs, and the comparison of these with the national average.

The benefits of using the CORE Dashboard are:

  1.  Increased and simplified collaboration between the aggregator and the content provider.
  2. Better control of the content provider over the harvested content.
  3. Reduction of scepticism and fear of sharing content with other systems.
  4. Improvement of the harvesting process.
  5. Broadening of the open access content discoverability and thus reuse of the open access content where permitted.

The idea of the CORE Dashboard can be generalised to the collaboration of any aggregator with content providers (libraries, archives, etc.). The overall aim is to strike a balance between the ability of aggregators effectively disseminate content while allowing content providers to keep full control over it at all times.

Petr Knoth is a Research Fellow at the Knowledge Media Institute, The Open University. He is interested in research in Natural Language Processing, Information Retrieval, Digital Libraries and Open Science. In 2010, he started the development of the first full-text open access aggregator of research papers called CORE (http://core.ac.uk). Since that time, he has led a team developing more than seven European Commission (EC) funded projects. He has acted as the principal investigator on the EC-funded projects Europeana Cloud, FOSTER and OpenMinTeD, all of which deal with issues related to research publications, such as reliably storing and text-mining them as well as supporting the research publication workflow. He has contributed a number of papers at international conferences and to journals such as COLING, NTCIR, Open Repositories and DLib. He is also the main organiser of the international workshops on mining scientific publications (WOSP 2012, WOSP 2013 and WOSP 2014).

8.2 Developing Infrastructure to Support Closer Collaboration of Aggregators with Open Repositories 

8.3 A Library-Publisher Partnership for Open Access: Building an Innovative Relationship between Scholarly Publishers and Academic Libraries

Monica Ward, Canadian Research Knowledge Network, Canada
Joanie Lavoie, Érudit Consortium, Canada

As the importance of open access continues to grow, there remains no clear consensus on the ideal model to sustain scholarly publishing while making content openly accessible. Can a solution be found that meets the needs of both the scholarly publishers and university libraries? The Érudit Consortium and the Canadian Research Knowledge Network (CRKN) are exploring one solution to this challenge through a strategic partnership that supports the move towards open access for Canadian francophone scholarly journals.

CRKN and Érudit have had a relationship through a traditional commercial subscription model since 2008. In 2014 the two organisations recognised the need for a new relationship that would address two major challenges: the fragility of the Canadian scholarly publishing environment and the increasing pressure from libraries and funding agencies for scholarly journals to move towards open access.

Érudit and CRKN have worked collaboratively to create an innovative partnership, which provides a framework for a new relationship between publishers and libraries, and helps to provide financial support to Canadian publishers during the transition to a fully open access model.

The paper presents the perspectives of the two organisations involved in the partnership, outlining the common goals, objectives, and strategy, as well as the differing needs and perspectives of libraries and publishers. It will summarise the steps taken to achieve this partnership, the success factors, the challenges faced, and the next steps in moving the project ahead. In addition, the paper will provide insight for other organisations which may be seeking to address similar challenges in a collaborative fashion.

Through this case study, the authors will demonstrate how university libraries can play an active role in developing models to support open access to research. Session attendees will have the unique opportunity to witness the evolution of this innovative joint project between the Canadian academic library community and the Canadian scholarly publishing community.

The Canadian Research Knowledge Network (CRKN) is a partnership of 75 Canadian universities dedicated to expanding digital content for the academic research enterprise in Canada. Érudit is the leading publishing platform for peer-reviewed francophone journals in North America, with content from almost 150 academic and cultural publishers available on their platform.

Monica Ward is Senior Content and Licensing Officer at the Canadian Research Knowledge Network (CRKN), and is responsible for administering the content programme including coordinating the renewal and negotiations process, on-going license agreement management, and license maintenance support. She provides staff support for the Content Strategy Committee and other committees and task groups, as well as overseeing the frontline member services function. Monica has an Honours BA in Sociology and received her Master of Library and Information Studies (MLIS) from Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia. Her professional interests include open access, collaboration through consortia, and license negotiations.

Joanie Lavoie is Director of Operations (Directrice des operations) of the Érudit Consortium, located in Montreal, Quebec. After completing her studies in literature and publishing, as well as a Masters in Arts and Culture management, she decided to apply her keen interest in the digital environment to the service of scholarly publishers. She joined Érudit in 2011 as the Journal Manager, responsible for increasing the visibility of Canadian Frenchlanguage journals in the national and international market. She is now the Director of Operations and has been a driving force in the partnership for open access with the Canadian research libraries since its inception, and is responsible for implementing the economic outcomes of this shift to open access with the publishers Érudit represents.

8.3 A Library-Publisher Partnership for Open Access

COFFEE BREAK @ MacMillan Hall/Crush Hall, Ground Floor Posters/Exhibition in Beveridge Hall, Ground Floor
Jun 25 @ 10:30 am – 11:00 am
Plenary Session @ Beveridge Hall, Ground Hall
Jun 25 @ 11:00 am – 11:30 am

Open Access in the Humanities Disciplines: Why is it so Hard and How
Can We Fix it?

INVITED SPEAKER: Dr Martin Paul Eve, Senior Lecturer, Literature, Technology and
Publishing, Birkbeck, University of London, UK

It is widely acknowledged that open access has met with a series of resistances in the humanities, both cultural and economic, that have not appeared in STEM subjects. From arguments against the entire principle, through to the economic challenges of research monographs, open access for the humanities, in both its gold and green forms, seems a far more distant prospect than might now be presumed in many scientific fields.

In this talk, Dr Martin Paul Eve will outline the specific challenges for the humanities disciplines and the range of potential solutions that are emerging. Spanning the political imperatives, the economic realities and the internal cultures of the academic humanities, this talk will argue that disciplinespecific rhetorics and particular economic strategies, such as consortial cost-pooling, are more likely to advance the cause of open access in these disciplines than a straightforward assumption that they must replicate the sciences.

Drawing on a range of case studies and the speaker’s own experience of launching the Open Library of Humanities, this talk will give participants an overview of where open access stands in the humanities today, worldwide, while also giving a sense of how much distance there remains to travel.

Dr Martin Paul Eve is a Senior Lecturer in Literature, Technology and Publishing at Birkbeck, University of London. In addition to his work on contemporary fiction, he is the author of Open Access and the Humanities: Contexts, Controversies and the Future (Cambridge University Press, 2014) and a founder and co-director of the Open Library of Humanities. He is also a member of the Jisc Scholarly Communications Advisory Board, the OAPEN-UK Steering Committee and sat on the HEFCE Open Access Monographs Expert Reference Group.

 

Discussion
Jun 25 @ 11:30 am – 11:45 am
Poster Session I: Poster Presentations @ Beveridge Hall, Ground Hall
Jun 25 @ 11:45 am – 12:00 pm

1. Building Research Data Management Services – A Helsinki University Library Case

Mari Elisa Kuusniemi, Katri Larmo, Tiina Heino, Helsinki University Library, Finland

In 2012 Helsinki University Library began a year’s staff training to enhance library staff’s research data expertise. The objective was to learn about researchers’ research data management (RDM) practices. After the training we started to plan RDM services. Promoting good data management and sharing practices is the basis for open science.

The Case

Library staff training was implemented through workshops and seminars as well as learning and development assignments. By teaching each other, participants got to know national and international research data repositories, best practices and data policies in various fields. Researchers visited the workshops and provided case examples, e.g. handling of metadata and personal data in register-based studies. Data repository providers presented their services. After the staff training, we started to plan RDM training and guidance services for researchers. In the spring of 2014, we had three workshops to plan RDM training for newly- organised doctoral schools in the University of Helsinki.

Currently the RDM services are developing at a good pace. In spring 2015 we have helped researchers to create RDM plans for Horizon 2020 grant applications. We have especially emphasised:

  • Sharing and opening data and research methods
  • Publishing open access
  • Taking the costs of data curation into account

As the RDM services are developing, we are also able to evaluate how well the library staff training has prepared us for this new task. Some aspects went just as expected, others could have been done differently. We learned that:

  • It is not easy to jump into giving RDM services. One time training is a good starting point, but it is not enough. Further learning will take place with concrete cases.
  • RDM services should be based on networking and cooperating with other players (e.g. the IT-department, financial advisers, lawyers, national projects). It is also important that the library’s organisation and management supports them.

Conclusions

Many European libraries are getting started with RDM services. Currently, we are piloting RDM services for researchers. This case report provides an example of how a library can get started with RDM and in this way strengthen open science.

Building Research Data Management Services

 

2. Copyright Information and Librarian´s New Role

Inga-Lill Anita Nilsson, Karlstad University Library, Sweden

The purpose of this presentation is to share thoughts and ideas on how to increase interest and knowledge among librarians about intellectual property issues.

Intellectual property issues have become more important in publishing, access and reuse of scientific research but it is not an easy transition. Often, copyright is seen as a difficult area in society with problems in balancing authors’ rights and the community use of research and cultural works. This is complicated by rapid changes in technology and the ever increasing impact of the internet.

Libraries promote institutional repositories and help authors to understand and retain their rights as well as advocating for open access and increasing the visibility of research. The complex nature of digital publications presents various problems regarding licenses and regulations. These new services require a range of new skills and expertise within libraries. A better understanding of copyright and how to use copyrighted material is needed to support teaching and research. It is necessary to provide a wider understanding of copyright and not only focus on legal aspects.

The importance of law reformation and the librarian´s role has been highlighted during 2014. Several European studies have been made to investigate copyright literacy among librarians. These studies have shown a lack of knowledge and a need to add copyright to the Library and Information Science curriculum. Librarians have to acquire skills, confidence and legitimacy to work with copyright guidance. Librarians need to stay informed and by sharing experiences and embracing these activities in our daily routines we can build knowledge and confidence.

Karlstad University Library has been working with copyright guidance over a long period of time. Every copyright question is unique and rather complex, which is why we try to foster close cooperation between librarians and faculty. Subject librarians play an important role in supporting academic scholarship. We believe intellectual property issues in libraries have received too little attention and so we have established a network of Swedish librarians to increase interest in copyright issues. We have studied several web resources to identify existing and future needs.

The poster will give a report on the findings on staff skills, roles and required competencies. We hope to inspire librarians to discuss their roles in the pursuit of intellectual property and copyright enforcement.

Copyright Information and Librarian´s New Role

 

3. The Quality and Visibility of Library Digital Collections as Cornerstones of Open Science in Humanities: Belgrade University Library’s Historical Newspaper Collection

Adam Sofronijevic, Aleksandar Jerkov, Nikola Smolenski, Dejana Kavaja Stanisic, Svetozar Markovic University Library, Serbia

The poster presents work carried out by Belgrade University Library in creating a quality digital collection of historical newspapers and promoting it to users.

In the course of the Europeana Newspapers project (www.europeana-newspapers.eu) Belgrade University Library refined its digital collection of historical newspapers and acquired fully searchable METS/ALTO files for the entire collection. The collection consists of 46 publications printed on 400,000 pages. Although the OCR process was implemented with a high accuracy rate of 98%, the main complaint from researchers was about this one point. The less than perfect accuracy of OCR impeded both the precision of searching and the overall usability of the collection.

User demand is for 100% accuracy of the newspapers texts and to achieve this, a corrector for the METS/ALTO files was needed. Limited budgets made it necessary to develop an in-house solution which was created in 2014. Several innovative programming solutions which made this unique corrector possible will be presented in the poster. Once a functioning tool was available, there was then the problem of correcting thousands of pages. The solution so far is on-site work by volunteers, librarians and researchers willing to contribute their efforts in correcting texts. Real live data on the time needed for correction depending on publication date and content will be presented, along with the quality control process employed. The most up-to-date data at the point of finalisation of the poster will be provided.

The other important cornerstone making such a digital collection a true foundation enabling the principles of Open Science for researchers in humanities is effective visibility of the collection for researchers, and for the general public interested in participating in Citizen Science projects based on such collections. The poster will demonstrate the partnership between Belgrade University Library and the Serbian national broadcasting service in bringing information about this collection to the general public and to the specific user group of humanities researchers. About a dozen TV and radio shows have used historical newspapers from this collection in order to show best practice in its use, and a widely disseminated national web portal presented over 20 texts with the same aim over six months in 2014 and 2015.

The Quality and Visibility of Library Digital Collections as Cornerstones of Open Science in Humanities

 

4. Constructing the Multilingual Thesaurus and Ontology Service Finto as a Tool for Promoting Open Science

Susanna Nykyri, Satu Niininen, National Library of Finland, Finland

With an overwhelming amount of research being published globally in a wide range of formats, locating and accessing relevant information can be a challenge. Although open access is an important tool for removing financial, legal and technical barriers to information, it is not on its own enough to cross the language gap between different cultures.

Language plays a key role in participating in the global scientific community. Through multilingual metadata, information can be located and retrieved across languages so that resources indexed using one language can be retrieved using another.

Finto is a service for publication and utilisation of ontologies, thesauri, vocabularies and classifications. It provides a user interface for browsing vocabularies and open interfaces for utilising them in other applications. The service also aims to provide high-quality metadata tools for the public sector. Finto is being developed as a joint venture between the National Library of Finland, the Finnish Ministry of Finance, and the Finnish Ministry of Education and Culture. Furthermore, in order to promote open science and free access to information, the service is being developed in an open manner and all its contents are available free-of-charge as open linked data.

One of the main tasks in the Finto project is to develop General Finnish Ontology YSO in Finnish, Swedish and English. YSO is constructed by merging together the General Finnish Thesaurus and its counterpart in Swedish into a single hierarchical structure that explicitly specifies the concepts of a given domain and their relationships in a machine-readable format. Furthermore, the resulting ontology is translated into English and linked to the Library of Congress Subject Headings in order to link YSO with a global network of metadata.

Working in a trilingual environment poses a number of language and culture-related challenges. As each culture conceptualises the world from its own viewpoint, meanings are seldom symmetrical across languages. Building a harmonious and understandable hierarchy in more than one language is a complex process and requires compromises. Moreover, translating the complete ontology into English and linking the concepts to LCSH involves connecting two very different languages together and requires a clear definition of an acceptable level of equivalence.

This presentation illustrates the process and methods of constructing multilingual thesaurus and ontology services.

Constructing the Multilingual Thesaurus and Ontology Service Finto as a Tool for Promoting Open Science

 

5. A Portal for the Scientific Outputs of Researchers in the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya

Anna Rovira, Javier Clavero, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, BarcelonaTECH, Spain

This paper presents the creation of FUTUR, the portal for the scientific outputs of researchers at the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC), which was supported by the Libraries Service and launched in April 2014.

FUTUR offers academic information on UPC researchers and includes: 198,818 publications, 11,719 projects, 1,042 patents generated by 3,500 researchers linked to 298 UPC research groups. The scientific output contained in FUTUR is mainly provided by the UPC’s current research information system and institutional repository. FUTUR is enhanced with data contained in the repository for doctoral theses at Catalan universities and the database of the Spanish Patent and Trademark Office. It also features the social network citation counter Altmetrics, which gathers citations of the portal’s publications on social networks.

Researchers and research groups can personalise the pages featuring their CVs by publishing the following: a photograph, their areas of expertise, the collaborative networks to which they belong, their h-index, identifiers such as ORCID, ResearcherID and Scopus Author Identifier, and their professional rank and qualifications. The portal is published in three languages and is compliant with mobile devices.

Through this corporate web portal, the University aims to meet the following objectives:

  • To provide researchers with a corporate publishing tool for their CVs
  • To provide open access to scientific publications
  • To raise the profile and heighten the impact of UPC researchers and UPC research worldwide

The main benefits of the portal are:

  • For researchers, the portal adds value to the research effort.
  • For the Libraries Service, the portal embeds librarians in the research workflow and allows them to ensure that the information presented is of a high quality.

This paper deals with the technical aspects, development and main achievements of the project carried out in collaboration with other UPC units. Future challenges, such as additional features and new opportunities, are also presented.

A Portal for the Scientific Outputs of Researchers in the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya

 

6. Let a Thousand ORCIDs Bloom: Introducing the ORCID Identifier at Imperial College London

Torsten Reimer, Imperial College London, UK

ORCID, the Open Researcher and Contributor ID, has found rapid uptake in the global scholarly community. Over a million authors are now registered and research funders, publishers and academic institutions are joining ORCID as members. This paper will introduce the audience to ORCID, its role in scholarly communication and research information management, and describe the experience of introducing ORCID at a research intensive university – Imperial College London.

ORCID is a not-for profit membership organisation that aims to change the way scholarly outputs are associated with authors. ORCID addresses the problem that it is frequently difficult to reliably identify an author by name. Not only do many researchers share the same name, often even in the same institution, but names can also change or are inconsistently abbreviated or misspelled. ORCID provides a unique identifier that can be used to claim authorship of a publication, data sets or other outputs such as software.

Authors benefit by increased visibility, but also through systems integration. Symplectic Elements, the system Imperial scholars use to record their outputs, can automatically claim publications when it detects a matching ORCID in the metadata. In the future, authors may no longer have to submit publication lists to funders – when relevant systems support ORCID providing the personal identifier may be enough. ORCID could also help meeting funders’ Open Access requirements, for example for the UK’s Research Excellence Framework, which requires the deposit of articles on acceptance for publication. Using ORCID, publishers could share metadata or even accepted manuscripts with the host institutions of the authors – identified through their iD. This would reduce the burden on authors and help universities to support the process and monitor compliance.

To support the academic community at Imperial and to advance the uptake of ORCID in general, Imperial College has set up a project to provide all academic staff with an iD. This was achieved in December 2014 and within less than two months some 1,200 researchers linked their iD back to Symplectic Elements. This paper will discuss ORCID in the global scholarly publication system, report on the results of the Imperial College project and outline future opportunities – in particular, how ORCID could help meeting open access requirements of the post-2014 REF.

Let a Thousand ORCIDs Bloom

 

7. An iDEa to Utilise Repository Content in Innovative Ways

Gyöngyi Karácsony, Edit Görögh, University of Debrecen, Hungary

In today’s scholarly communication discourse repositories are not merely storage places to collect and preserve the intellectual output of university communities, but they are important elements of university infrastructures with customised services built upon them. The digital repository of the University of Debrecen (DEA) has multiple functions. It preserves research publications, digitised content and educational materials.

The development of a database specifically for research data has also been started. Furthermore, beside the preservation function, DEA is an integral part of the reporting system of the University’s scholarly activities. Repository content is also utilised to enhance visibility of the institution; it is connected to numerous European networks; and participates in various aggregation programmes of scholarly results and research data. Overall, DEA contributes to open access activities in Europe.

The University Library of Debrecen has developed a new academic tool for researchers, teachers and students by rechannelling the content of the institutional repository. The iDEa portal of the University of Debrecen (www.idea.unideb.hu) presents a state-of-the-art medium to search and disseminate scholarly results. The portal functions as an up-to-date and effective tool in academic discourse offering information about the institution’s academic activities and creating a new channel for information dissemination. It functions as an online scientific and social forum for future generations of researchers.

As an essential part of the iDEa portal, the Research Profiles present the academic activities and the professional profiles of the institution’s researchers. The Research Profiles serve multiple purposes: they offer easy access to publication lists, create an electronic calling card for our researchers by which a comprehensive picture about the researcher’s scholarly and teaching activities and his/her off-campus life is displayed. They introduce the works and results of research units, support browsing among the research fields and subjects, and help identifying researchers connected to them.

The poster will demonstrate the primary functions of the portal system and the various tools the system offers through the rechannelling of the repository content of the university.

An iDEa to Utilise Repository Content in Innovative Ways

 

8. The University Library in Research Evaluation

Asger Væring Larsen, The University of Southern Denmark, Denmark

The University Library of Southern Denmark participates actively in research evaluation in a number of ways. However, this undertaking is fraught with challenges.

Research has always been evaluated by other researchers, but now there is a tendency for policy makers and research management among others to require more and more detailed assessments of the research – its reach, quality and impact. SDUB’s mission is to support the University in reaching its strategic goals, and the Library is spending considerable resources in this endeavour. A transparent research and publication process which is the result of true Open Science will assist everyone who is engaged with research evaluation, will enable development of new tools and methods and will change the entire game of research evaluation. The challenges that are connected with access to publications, research data and methods will be alleviated by the advent of Open Science leaving us with trying to overcome the inherent conceptual challenges associated with interpreting e.g. bibliometric proxies for research quality and impact. This paper presents the tasks and challenges involved in this context and discuss future library initiatives in bibliometrics, Open Science and data management.

8. The University Library in Research Evaluation

 

9. When Does a Researcher Need a Digital Library? – A Contextual Analysis of Researchers’ Information Needs

Heli Kautonen, National Library of Finland, Finland

While libraries are reshaping their digital services, the work practices of academic researchers across all disciplines are changing. There is evidence of profound changes in the information behaviour of so-called digital natives, but seasoned scholars, too, seem to be adopting new ways of conducting their work. This change poses a challenge to research libraries: we have constantly to update our knowledge of our customers.

People’s information needs are interwoven with aspects of their everyday life. It is, therefore, not adequate to study information behaviour in relation to a single digital service, or even within the context of a library. Recent research has introduced methods that take into account users’ real life context and deepen our understanding of users’ needs.

This paper presents a qualitative analysis of researchers’ needs in relation to the Finnish Digital Library, Finna. Our motivation to study this group of Finna’s users arose from the fact that all Finnish research libraries were to join Finna before 2015. Thus, we had to take into account a large end-user group with variable needs. We adopted a contextual approach and posed the following research questions: When does a researcher need a digital library? How does s/he use a digital library in the research process?

We based the analysis on data from two independent studies: 1) a user survey provided responses from 129 researchers; and 2) a contextual study provided interviews with 12 researchers from different fields of science. We reflected the findings from these two studies, first against each other, and then to the concept of ‘Reconfiguring Access’ by Dutton (2010). This concept depicts the coevolution of technology and social processes in the context of research.

The results did not indicate any dramatic findings or differences between fields of science. The digital library was only an information resource among others. The analysis suggests that as researchers use different information tools in tandem, they also compare the relevance of their functionalities, e.g. search results, at every turn.

The analysis detected only few indications of a wider reconfiguration of use, i.e. how researchers use digital resources for purposes other than information retrieval. These notions of collaboration, observation, analysis, and distribution, which can be seen as signals of change in researchers’ work practices, may be transferable in the development of smarter information environments.

When Does a Researcher Need a Digital Library

 

10. Open Source in Libraries – Opportunity or Threat?

Markku Heinäsenaho, National Library of Finland, Finland

Libraries are dependent on software products in many ways. Sometimes, we need to make little changes in order to fit them to our purpose. However, past experience has shown that this can be very expensive and/or time-consuming. In trying to find our way around the black-box systems we have resorted to hacking, which has brought about even more complexity.

The need for customisation stems, of course, from the technological paradigm shift of the recent past. The rise of the network has transformed the workflows of libraries and given birth to a new set of requirements. Ironically, the systems that we have come accustomed to calling ‘Integrated Library Systems’ have little or no association with these emerged workflows. We have ended up with a wide array of disintegrated systems dealing with acquisition, discovery, link resolving, knowledge bases, digital collections. Managing the resulting complexity has required from us a focus shift away from end user needs and into solving ICT-related problems. While the vendors have been slow in their response, the library community has been forced to act on its own and develop technical skills. Against this backdrop, it is easy to understand why open source is gaining popularity among libraries.

For most libraries professional software development is a relatively unfamiliar domain of activity. We are enthusiastic about the possibilities of open source but sometimes, in my experience, this enthusiasm suppresses the equally important discussion about the responsibilities involved. Because of their almost infinite complexity, information systems are fundamentally unstable and in constant need of maintenance. In order to facilitate this, there are countless best practices for developing, testing, integrating, publishing and maintaining information systems. Needless to say, all this is very well known by the software industry. And yet, most of the software in daily use, some of it produced by the world’s most advanced firms, is a constant source of dissatisfaction to us. Having said that, the decision whether to allocate resources to software engineering and ICT management should not be made lightly. This does not, however, mean that we should be overly pessimistic about the potential of benefitting from open source. The point is merely that there are many things that need to be considered before taking this step. The purpose of this poster is to discuss these considerations.

10.Open source in Libraries

 

11. Science Set Free: An Open Access Infrastructure for Europe

Najla Rettberg, University of Göttingen, Germany

Recently launched, OpenAIRE2020 is the European Union initiative for an Open Access Infrastructure for Research which supports open scholarly communication and access to the research output of European-funded projects. The substantial technical infrastructure operates on two levels:

Gathering research outputs: OpenAIRE gathers open access content from a network of institutional and disciplinary repositories. To put this into practice, an integrated suite of guidelines has been developed so that data sources, namely literature and data repositories, OA publishers and CRIS systems can be harvested and their contents made more visible. The portal gives access to EU-funded scientific publications, and also provides monitoring tools for depositing and usage statistics.

Policy harmonisation and community outreach: OpenAIRE has a collaborative and thriving ‘human’ network, which is pan-European in nature. The community works to advance open access initiatives at national levels. It has National Open Access Desks in nearly 30 countries, and operates a European Helpdesk system for all matters concerning open access, copyright and repository interoperability.

OpenAIRE is starting to move from a publication infrastructure to a more comprehensive infrastructure that covers all types of scientific output, and is establishing an infrastructure to harvest, enrich and store the metadata of scientific datasets. Cross-links from publications to data and funding schemes will be supported. This interlinking of research objects has implications for optimising the research process, allowing the sharing, enrichment and reuse of data.

The poster presented will outline the activities of OpenAIRE. It will also highlight the following themes: advocating open access, repository guidelines, visibility of the European research environment, enhanced publications and sharing and reuse of research data.

Science Set Free

 

12. Write Your Name into the History of Science

Kristina Pai, Anneli Sepp, University of Tartu Library, Estonia

The University of Tartu Library has been offering all its alumni the possibility of granting the library the permission to add their graduation theses to the University’s digital archive DSpace for two years now.

Ten years ago, the UT Library was the first in Estonia to start the current electronic archiving of doctoral theses. The development of a complete collection of e-dissertations is guaranteed by a change in the University regulation concerning the defence of doctoral dissertations, which obliges doctoral students to cooperate with the digital archive. Digitisation of older doctoral theses, defended throughout the University’s 382-year history, was also started in 2004. Today, the University requires that all theses – doctoral, Master’s and Bachelor’s should be electronically archived.

For the project ‘Write Your Name into the History of Science’, we expect alumni to archive their bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral theses and prize-winning essays and studies completed before the onset of the ‘digital age’. We believe it is important that the international scientific community should have electronic access to works that have so far been available only in printed form. Alumni can submit their work for archiving by digitally signing (as it is customary in Estonia) an electronic agreement. The authors permit their works to be digitised at the Library and uploaded to the UT digital archive. Permission can also be obtained from the descendants of deceased alumni. Calls for alumni to submit their works to the digital archive and additional information was promoted via social media and on TV, and via different web pages and community lists.

Today, the digital collection of UT theses and research works contains:

  • 2,443 doctoral theses defended at the University of Tartu during the recent decade;
  • 1,886 theses and studies written from the 17th century up to 1918;
  • 6,985 already born-digital or digitised bachelor’s and master’s theses from the second half of the 19th century up to the present day.

All these materials have been integrated into the DART-Europe E-theses Portal. The UT Library is also ready to archive research data.

UT pays meticulous attention to authors’ rights. For the UT Library, cooperation with alumni is essential in making the theses defended at the University accessible to the students and researchers of today and tomorrow. Our project actively supports the Open Access initiative and we are all for the OA publication principle!

12. Write Your Name into the History of Science

 

14 Open Science State-of-the-Art in the Czech Technical University in Prague

Lenka Nemeckova, Iva Adlerova, Ilona Trtikova, Marta Machytkova, Czech University in Prague, Czech Republic

Imagine an Ideal Open Science academic world – no matter what the level of excellency and research field, researchers all follow similar research cycles: read – get funding – work – finish – (patent) – publish – and … disseminate? There is an Open Science challenge at every stage:

Read – follow OA publications, repositories, DOAJ, use open data.

Get funding – funder’s OA policy, OA text and data requirements.

Work – communicate, cooperate, share data, methodologies, collect and analyse results.

Finish and publish – select medium to publish in; meet funder’s requirements, R&D assessment requirements and institutional OA policies.

Patent brings information embargo during the research process; a significant aspect with regard to Open Science.

Disseminate – self-archive, disseminate research results via Green OA – repositories, social networks, data repositories, etc.

Based on the SPARC Europe Checklist, we have not come far. We have laid solid foundations by implementing parts of Open Science, but some aspects, including user motivation are ‘sci-fi’ for us. We run a repository connected to the University and international infrastructures; we provide OA publishing guidance, including Horizon 2020 requirements; we support ORCID identification; and we help researchers promote their work by OA publishing, self-archiving, data sharing and social networks. We do our best to teach PhD students e-research principles, OA, Open Science, publishing standards, etc. in normal classes as well as through single lectures.

There are many challenges within Open Science. Some aspects, however, are not within the Library’s competencies, so our role is partly one of coordination. We tend to be ahead of our University demands, foresee trends in Open Science publishing and policies, and need to get support by the University management. As such we would need to push implementing institutional and national OA policies, CC licensing, data repositories, open educational materials, etc.

We want to help researchers to get more out of Open Science/OA than they are able at this point. Now, we intend to focus on more aspects of Open Science during the research cycle, on open communication, Open Access publishing and dissemination of research results. We do have success with individual researchers and journal editors. We wish to motivate more pioneers and show that Open Science is a step towards excellence. We need to open their eyes and minds to Open Science to open their opportunities to survive in today’s academic world.

Open Science State-of-the-Art in the Czech Technical University in Prague

 

15. CANCELLED

16 The University Library as an Open Science Partner

Bertil Dorch, Asger Væring Larsen, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark

The University Library of Southern Denmark is increasingly involved in the Open Science movement through different activities which are in line with University strategy and policy. This paper presents a case which shows how these activities come into play in a successful way.

Odense University was established in 1966 as a medical university, but today it is a five faculty institution with ca. 1,500 academics and 30,000 students on six campuses. The Library employs ca. 110 librarians, information specialists and others, supporting the University’s researchers and students. The last couple of years have seen a change in the range and types of services and support functions the Library offers.

Open Science usually covers Open Research and Open Access and thus means unlimited access to research publications, results and methods for everyone. The Library activities in this area include publisher memberships yielding author discounts on Article Processing Charges, dissemination of publications through registration of metadata and full texts, administration of the bibliometric research indicator programme and teaching Responsible Conduct of Research. The case also offers an insight into the additional support offered by other parts of the University. This includes a course in project management, commercialisation of elements of the research results and support in communicating through press releases. Finally, the case exemplifies the development in cooperation between the University and the University Library and shows how Open Science is becoming more integrated into the everyday activities of the entire institution.

The University Library as an Open Science Partner

 

17. Quality Open Access Market

Leo Waaijers, The National Library of The Netherlands

This year we wish to present QOAM (www.qoam.eu) to the LIBER Annual Conference for a second time. QOAM’s mission remains unchanged: ‘Quality Open Access Market is primarily for authors who want to publish their article in open access in a high quality journal and for a reasonable price’, but during the past year QOAM’s development has made considerable progress.

The Journal Score Card has been divided into two separate cards: the Base Score Card and the Valuation Score Card. The Base Score Card analyses the transparency of a journal’s web site and might be completed mainly by libraries wishing to resume their professional role in journal quality control, a role that was lost in the big deal licenses. The Valuation Score Card shares author experiences with a journal. The combination of both scores constitutes a journal’s SWOT matrix, resulting in four journal categories: Strong and Weaker journals, those which are a Threat (to authors) and journals which are an Opportunity (to publishers).

On the price information side, QOAM already collected publication fees as quoted on a journal’s website (via the Base Score Card) and the real price as paid by an author (via the Valuation Score Card). As a new step, QOAM now also gives the discounts that authors get if their institution has settled an OA licence with a publisher. In the Netherlands, for example, this information is provided to QOAM by SURFmarket, the national licencing agency.

Finally, we succeeded in simplifying our log in procedure. QOAM now follows the same system as that used by the popular ResearchGate network; an institutional email address is all you need. Thus QOAM combines ease of access with a limitation to the academic world for publishing Journal Score Cards.

QOAM is an academic self-help instrument that fully depends on the contributions of libraries, authors and journal editors. It is independent of publishers although a growing list of publishers have included their OA and hybrid journals in QOAM for academic judgement. Today QOAM has 17,000+ journals waiting to be scored.

QOAM should become the meeting point where ‘shopping authors’ can select a journal to publish their article in; publishers may find out how to improve their journal and funders; and policy makers, journalists and the public at large can enter a transparent academic publishing environment. For that, QOAM has to go viral like the H-index, ReseachGate or Wikipedia. The aim of our presentation is to achieve just that.

17. Quality Open Access Market

 

18. Open Repository Theseus – A Success Story of 25 Finnish Universities of Applied Sciences

Minna Elina Marjamaa1, Tiina Tolonen2, Anna-Liisa Holmström3 1Laurea University of Applied Sciences; 2Oulu University of Applied Sciences; 3Lahti University of Applied Sciences

Poster

The Theseus poster represents the cooperation model used in building a joint open repository for 25 Finnish Universities of Applied Sciences (UAS). The aim is to showcase our cooperation model created for the Theseus Open Repository, its aim, policy user support and further developments. The model is resource saving for universities as students independently upload their work and user support is centralised with common instructions.

Initiative

In 2008 Finland’s Universities of Applied Sciences created an open repository for theses and research publications. A joint project of UASs to build a common repository helped us to tackle both technical and copyright issues. The essential goal of the project was to make a user-friendly one-stop shop for all UAS research. Soon after the introduction of the repository, the objective proved to be a success. At present, Theseus has approximately 80,000 Bachelor’s and Master’s theses uploaded into the repository.

Further developments

Open Access Statement and the start of self-archiving

In January 2010 Finnish Universities of Applied Sciences declared an Open Access statement together. In this statement, the UASs require all teachers and researchers to save a copy of their research essays published in scientific publications, or in a university publication series, in the Open Repository Theseus.

Nevertheless, the self-archiving of research papers has not yet started on a full scale. For the time being, there are about 500 research publications in Theseus and the number is growing very slowly. Although self-archiving is required, there is as yet no pressure or processes being created for this purpose by UAS management.

Streaming service

Most theses are still in traditional written format, converted into PDF files and uploaded with abstract and metadata to create a record. Yet even from the very beginning, there was a growing interest in creating theses or parts of them as a sound sample or video, and the Theseus initiative took on streaming as one the main objectives of the repository. If all goes well, we will be able to launch the streaming service for Theseus in 2015. We will start by offering streaming for audio-visual works which do not contain material under copyright restrictions.

Open Repository Theseus

 

19. CANCELLED

20. Making Publication-Related Research Data Available: Practices in a University Hospital

Isabelle de Kaenel, Mathilde Panes, Medical Library, University Hospital, Lausanne,

Switzerland

Introduction: The sharing of biomedical research data is important for reasons of transparency and potential re-use in further research. Funding agencies and scientific publishers play a key role in mandating and enabling sharing and are also committed to increasing transparency and promoting reproducibility of data published in research literature. Despite the fact that all signs point to tightening requirements for sharing at the time of publication, research data management planning in Swiss academic institutions is slow in coming.

This poster presents an overview of the current data sharing practices at the University hospital Lausanne (Switzerland).

Methods: We extracted from the institutional repository of the Faculty of Biology and Medicine the list of original articles published in 2014 (around 2,000 publications).

We then focused on 300 peer-reviewed publications which explicitly referred to data analysis (clinical trials, cohort study and experimental research).

These research articles were published in around 200 journals. We investigated the current data policies of these journals. We also investigated if any access to the data could be found in the online versions of these articles. For additional input, we organised interviews with researchers about their commitment to making the datasets publicly available.

Results: About 10% of the articles offered access to primary raw data online, essentially in journals which had specific guidelines concerning research data.

Conclusion: Both publication practices and interviews prove that researchers are not strongly active in giving access to primary data. Libraries cannot promote new scientific practices alone but they can assist in raising awareness and in organising training.

Making Publication-Related Research Data Available Making Publication-Related Research Data Available

 

21. CANCELLED

LUNCH @ MacMillan Hall, Ground Floor and Grand Lobby, First Floor
Jun 25 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Sponsor: Strategy Update @ Beveridge Hall, Ground Floor
Jun 25 @ 1:00 pm – 1:30 pm

Invenio ‘NEXT’: The Next Generation Digital Library

Kenneth Hole,TIND Technologies, Switzerland

TIND presentation

Sponsor: Strategy Update @ Beveridge Hall, Ground Floor
Jun 25 @ 1:30 pm – 2:00 pm

Discovery, Learning, Teaching: The Library as an Integral Part of Higher Education

Christine Stohn, Ex Libris, UK

The reasons for coming to the library (physically or virtually) are varied. For example, users might be looking for a specific item that was recommended or listed on a course reading list; they may want information to gain a general overview of a topic; they may be seeking material beyond their reading list to carry out an assignment; or perhaps they are instructors who are creating or extending their course reading lists.

In this session, we will discuss how libraries can and should be an integral part of teaching and learning. Results from recent user studies conducted by Ex Libris will be presented, along with the conclusions that we can draw about various aspects of discovery—searching, exploration, learning, and personalization—that support diverse user needs. We will also discuss synergies between library discovery and core resources such as reading lists and will offer a sneak preview of Leganto, the new Ex Libris reading-list tool. Bringing the needs of instructors, students, and the library together, this tool provides an integrated approach to creating reading lists, managing them, and enabling students to access them.

Christine Stohn, Senior Product Manager, Ex Libris. A major part of Christine’s role is to work with librarians and carry out original research to understand how users search and discover and to identify ways to enhance their discovery experience. Christine focuses on the Primo discovery search engine, the Primo Central Index and the bX Recommender. Christine has over 20 years of experience in the library industry, both in the content and on the technology aspects and holds a degree in library sciences from the Free University in Berlin and an information systems degree from the Open University in the UK.

Discovery, Learning, Teaching The Library

Plenary Session @ Beveridge Hall, Ground Floor
Jun 25 @ 2:00 pm – 2:45 pm

Strategies for Promoting Open Access in a Global Context

INVITED SPEAKER: Dr Manon Ress, Director, Information Society Projects, Knowledge Ecology International, USA

This presentation will focus on a new element within broader strategies to promote open access databases in the global context and also on the new role libraries can play in this Open Science effort.

A proposal for a ‘World Trade Organization (WTO) Agreement on the Supply of Social/Public Goods’ is aimed at addressing an under supply of social and public goods including, but not limited to, those involving knowledge goods. The proposal, among other things, is to use the status of the WTO and its dispute resolution mechanism to enforce commitments from governments that would have the effect of expanding public access to knowledge goods.

Some of the interest in the WTO proposal would involve social goods for health, development and security. However, the agreement would also be available to address important trade-related issues concerning access to governmentfunded research and databases, by providing a forum and an enforcement mechanism to address global free rider issues. As designed, the proposal would cover both funding commitments, to produce knowledge as a public good, and commitments regarding policies on global access to government-funded research.

To progress the proposal, experts have recently convened meetings in Berlin and Washington DC to discuss draft language that will introduce social/public goods into the WTO environment. The terms ‘asks’ and ‘offers’ would no longer exclusively reference the private goods market, nor privatisation and the enclosure of knowledge itself.

Librarians and other open data and open science advocates should participate in these negotiations, which are an important part of the movement to make openness more sustainable and consequential.

Dr Manon Ress is Director of Information Society Projects at Knowledge Ecology International, a non-government organization with offices in Washington, DC, and Geneva. She is an active participant at the World Intellectual Property Organization’s meetings of the Standing Committee on Copyright and Related Rights, and other multilateral and regional forums that discuss intellectual property rights, innovation and related topics. She is active in the Trans Atlantic Consumer Dialogue (TACD) working groups on intellectual property and information society, including the proposal for a Paris Accord between consumers and creative and inventive communities. Dr Ress work has focused on the protection on consumer and user rights in intellectual property norm setting,the development and use of open standards, open access publishing, the development of open access user generated databases, the use of prizes and other alternative reward mechanism to reward creative and inventive activity, disputes over jurisdiction and the enforcement of intellectual property rights and speech torts, and the development of distance education technologies.

Dr Ress holds a BA and a Master’s Degree from the Université de Nice, France as well as a Master’s and a PhD from Princeton University.

Strategies for promoting Open Access in a Global Context

COFFEE BREAK @ MacMillan Hall/Crush Hall, Ground Floor Posters/Exhibition in Beveridge Hall, Ground Floor
Jun 25 @ 2:45 pm – 3:15 pm
Poster Session II: Poster Presentations @ Beveridge Hall, Ground Floor
Jun 25 @ 3:15 pm – 3:30 pm

1. Building Research Data Management Services – A Helsinki University Library Case

Mari Elisa Kuusniemi, Katri Larmo, Tiina Heino, Helsinki University Library, Finland

In 2012 Helsinki University Library began a year’s staff training to enhance library staff’s research data expertise. The objective was to learn about researchers’ research data management (RDM) practices. After the training we started to plan RDM services. Promoting good data management and sharing practices is the basis for open science.

The Case

Library staff training was implemented through workshops and seminars as well as learning and development assignments. By teaching each other, participants got to know national and international research data repositories, best practices and data policies in various fields. Researchers visited the workshops and provided case examples, e.g. handling of metadata and personal data in register-based studies. Data repository providers presented their services. After the staff training, we started to plan RDM training and guidance services for researchers. In the spring of 2014, we had three workshops to plan RDM training for newly- organised doctoral schools in the University of Helsinki.

Currently the RDM services are developing at a good pace. In spring 2015 we have helped researchers to create RDM plans for Horizon 2020 grant applications. We have especially emphasised:

  • Sharing and opening data and research methods
  • Publishing open access
  • Taking the costs of data curation into account

As the RDM services are developing, we are also able to evaluate how well the library staff training has prepared us for this new task. Some aspects went just as expected, others could have been done differently. We learned that:

  • It is not easy to jump into giving RDM services. One time training is a good starting point, but it is not enough. Further learning will take place with concrete cases.
  • RDM services should be based on networking and cooperating with other players (e.g. the IT-department, financial advisers, lawyers, national projects). It is also important that the library’s organisation and management supports them.

Conclusions

Many European libraries are getting started with RDM services. Currently, we are piloting RDM services for researchers. This case report provides an example of how a library can get started with RDM and in this way strengthen open science.

Building Research Data Management Services

 

2. Copyright Information and Librarian´s New Role

Inga-Lill Anita Nilsson, Karlstad University Library, Sweden

The purpose of this presentation is to share thoughts and ideas on how to increase interest and knowledge among librarians about intellectual property issues.

Intellectual property issues have become more important in publishing, access and reuse of scientific research but it is not an easy transition. Often, copyright is seen as a difficult area in society with problems in balancing authors’ rights and the community use of research and cultural works. This is complicated by rapid changes in technology and the ever increasing impact of the internet.

Libraries promote institutional repositories and help authors to understand and retain their rights as well as advocating for open access and increasing the visibility of research. The complex nature of digital publications presents various problems regarding licenses and regulations. These new services require a range of new skills and expertise within libraries. A better understanding of copyright and how to use copyrighted material is needed to support teaching and research. It is necessary to provide a wider understanding of copyright and not only focus on legal aspects.

The importance of law reformation and the librarian´s role has been highlighted during 2014. Several European studies have been made to investigate copyright literacy among librarians. These studies have shown a lack of knowledge and a need to add copyright to the Library and Information Science curriculum. Librarians have to acquire skills, confidence and legitimacy to work with copyright guidance. Librarians need to stay informed and by sharing experiences and embracing these activities in our daily routines we can build knowledge and confidence.

Karlstad University Library has been working with copyright guidance over a long period of time. Every copyright question is unique and rather complex, which is why we try to foster close cooperation between librarians and faculty. Subject librarians play an important role in supporting academic scholarship. We believe intellectual property issues in libraries have received too little attention and so we have established a network of Swedish librarians to increase interest in copyright issues. We have studied several web resources to identify existing and future needs.

The poster will give a report on the findings on staff skills, roles and required competencies. We hope to inspire librarians to discuss their roles in the pursuit of intellectual property and copyright enforcement.

Copyright Information and Librarian´s New Role

 

3. The Quality and Visibility of Library Digital Collections as Cornerstones of Open Science in Humanities: Belgrade University Library’s Historical Newspaper Collection

Adam Sofronijevic, Aleksandar Jerkov, Nikola Smolenski, Dejana Kavaja Stanisic, Svetozar Markovic University Library, Serbia

The poster presents work carried out by Belgrade University Library in creating a quality digital collection of historical newspapers and promoting it to users.

In the course of the Europeana Newspapers project (www.europeana-newspapers.eu) Belgrade University Library refined its digital collection of historical newspapers and acquired fully searchable METS/ALTO files for the entire collection. The collection consists of 46 publications printed on 400,000 pages. Although the OCR process was implemented with a high accuracy rate of 98%, the main complaint from researchers was about this one point. The less than perfect accuracy of OCR impeded both the precision of searching and the overall usability of the collection.

User demand is for 100% accuracy of the newspapers texts and to achieve this, a corrector for the METS/ALTO files was needed. Limited budgets made it necessary to develop an in-house solution which was created in 2014. Several innovative programming solutions which made this unique corrector possible will be presented in the poster. Once a functioning tool was available, there was then the problem of correcting thousands of pages. The solution so far is on-site work by volunteers, librarians and researchers willing to contribute their efforts in correcting texts. Real live data on the time needed for correction depending on publication date and content will be presented, along with the quality control process employed. The most up-to-date data at the point of finalisation of the poster will be provided.

The other important cornerstone making such a digital collection a true foundation enabling the principles of Open Science for researchers in humanities is effective visibility of the collection for researchers, and for the general public interested in participating in Citizen Science projects based on such collections. The poster will demonstrate the partnership between Belgrade University Library and the Serbian national broadcasting service in bringing information about this collection to the general public and to the specific user group of humanities researchers. About a dozen TV and radio shows have used historical newspapers from this collection in order to show best practice in its use, and a widely disseminated national web portal presented over 20 texts with the same aim over six months in 2014 and 2015.

The Quality and Visibility of Library Digital Collections as Cornerstones of Open Science in Humanities

 

4. Constructing the Multilingual Thesaurus and Ontology Service Finto as a Tool for Promoting Open Science

Susanna Nykyri, Satu Niininen, National Library of Finland, Finland

With an overwhelming amount of research being published globally in a wide range of formats, locating and accessing relevant information can be a challenge. Although open access is an important tool for removing financial, legal and technical barriers to information, it is not on its own enough to cross the language gap between different cultures.

Language plays a key role in participating in the global scientific community. Through multilingual metadata, information can be located and retrieved across languages so that resources indexed using one language can be retrieved using another.

Finto is a service for publication and utilisation of ontologies, thesauri, vocabularies and classifications. It provides a user interface for browsing vocabularies and open interfaces for utilising them in other applications. The service also aims to provide high-quality metadata tools for the public sector. Finto is being developed as a joint venture between the National Library of Finland, the Finnish Ministry of Finance, and the Finnish Ministry of Education and Culture. Furthermore, in order to promote open science and free access to information, the service is being developed in an open manner and all its contents are available free-of-charge as open linked data.

One of the main tasks in the Finto project is to develop General Finnish Ontology YSO in Finnish, Swedish and English. YSO is constructed by merging together the General Finnish Thesaurus and its counterpart in Swedish into a single hierarchical structure that explicitly specifies the concepts of a given domain and their relationships in a machine-readable format. Furthermore, the resulting ontology is translated into English and linked to the Library of Congress Subject Headings in order to link YSO with a global network of metadata.

Working in a trilingual environment poses a number of language and culture-related challenges. As each culture conceptualises the world from its own viewpoint, meanings are seldom symmetrical across languages. Building a harmonious and understandable hierarchy in more than one language is a complex process and requires compromises. Moreover, translating the complete ontology into English and linking the concepts to LCSH involves connecting two very different languages together and requires a clear definition of an acceptable level of equivalence.

This presentation illustrates the process and methods of constructing multilingual thesaurus and ontology services.

Constructing the Multilingual Thesaurus and Ontology Service Finto as a Tool for Promoting Open Science

 

5. A Portal for the Scientific Outputs of Researchers in the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya

Anna Rovira, Javier Clavero, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, BarcelonaTECH, Spain

This paper presents the creation of FUTUR, the portal for the scientific outputs of researchers at the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC), which was supported by the Libraries Service and launched in April 2014.

FUTUR offers academic information on UPC researchers and includes: 198,818 publications, 11,719 projects, 1,042 patents generated by 3,500 researchers linked to 298 UPC research groups. The scientific output contained in FUTUR is mainly provided by the UPC’s current research information system and institutional repository. FUTUR is enhanced with data contained in the repository for doctoral theses at Catalan universities and the database of the Spanish Patent and Trademark Office. It also features the social network citation counter Altmetrics, which gathers citations of the portal’s publications on social networks.

Researchers and research groups can personalise the pages featuring their CVs by publishing the following: a photograph, their areas of expertise, the collaborative networks to which they belong, their h-index, identifiers such as ORCID, ResearcherID and Scopus Author Identifier, and their professional rank and qualifications. The portal is published in three languages and is compliant with mobile devices.

Through this corporate web portal, the University aims to meet the following objectives:

  • To provide researchers with a corporate publishing tool for their CVs
  • To provide open access to scientific publications
  • To raise the profile and heighten the impact of UPC researchers and UPC research worldwide

The main benefits of the portal are:

  • For researchers, the portal adds value to the research effort.
  • For the Libraries Service, the portal embeds librarians in the research workflow and allows them to ensure that the information presented is of a high quality.

This paper deals with the technical aspects, development and main achievements of the project carried out in collaboration with other UPC units. Future challenges, such as additional features and new opportunities, are also presented.

A Portal for the Scientific Outputs of Researchers in the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya

 

6. Let a Thousand ORCIDs Bloom: Introducing the ORCID Identifier at Imperial College London

Torsten Reimer, Imperial College London, UK

ORCID, the Open Researcher and Contributor ID, has found rapid uptake in the global scholarly community. Over a million authors are now registered and research funders, publishers and academic institutions are joining ORCID as members. This paper will introduce the audience to ORCID, its role in scholarly communication and research information management, and describe the experience of introducing ORCID at a research intensive university – Imperial College London.

ORCID is a not-for profit membership organisation that aims to change the way scholarly outputs are associated with authors. ORCID addresses the problem that it is frequently difficult to reliably identify an author by name. Not only do many researchers share the same name, often even in the same institution, but names can also change or are inconsistently abbreviated or misspelled. ORCID provides a unique identifier that can be used to claim authorship of a publication, data sets or other outputs such as software.

Authors benefit by increased visibility, but also through systems integration. Symplectic Elements, the system Imperial scholars use to record their outputs, can automatically claim publications when it detects a matching ORCID in the metadata. In the future, authors may no longer have to submit publication lists to funders – when relevant systems support ORCID providing the personal identifier may be enough. ORCID could also help meeting funders’ Open Access requirements, for example for the UK’s Research Excellence Framework, which requires the deposit of articles on acceptance for publication. Using ORCID, publishers could share metadata or even accepted manuscripts with the host institutions of the authors – identified through their iD. This would reduce the burden on authors and help universities to support the process and monitor compliance.

To support the academic community at Imperial and to advance the uptake of ORCID in general, Imperial College has set up a project to provide all academic staff with an iD. This was achieved in December 2014 and within less than two months some 1,200 researchers linked their iD back to Symplectic Elements. This paper will discuss ORCID in the global scholarly publication system, report on the results of the Imperial College project and outline future opportunities – in particular, how ORCID could help meeting open access requirements of the post-2014 REF.

Let a Thousand ORCIDs Bloom

 

7. An iDEa to Utilise Repository Content in Innovative Ways

Gyöngyi Karácsony, Edit Görögh, University of Debrecen, Hungary

In today’s scholarly communication discourse repositories are not merely storage places to collect and preserve the intellectual output of university communities, but they are important elements of university infrastructures with customised services built upon them. The digital repository of the University of Debrecen (DEA) has multiple functions. It preserves research publications, digitised content and educational materials.

The development of a database specifically for research data has also been started. Furthermore, beside the preservation function, DEA is an integral part of the reporting system of the University’s scholarly activities. Repository content is also utilised to enhance visibility of the institution; it is connected to numerous European networks; and participates in various aggregation programmes of scholarly results and research data. Overall, DEA contributes to open access activities in Europe.

The University Library of Debrecen has developed a new academic tool for researchers, teachers and students by rechannelling the content of the institutional repository. The iDEa portal of the University of Debrecen (www.idea.unideb.hu) presents a state-of-the-art medium to search and disseminate scholarly results. The portal functions as an up-to-date and effective tool in academic discourse offering information about the institution’s academic activities and creating a new channel for information dissemination. It functions as an online scientific and social forum for future generations of researchers.

As an essential part of the iDEa portal, the Research Profiles present the academic activities and the professional profiles of the institution’s researchers. The Research Profiles serve multiple purposes: they offer easy access to publication lists, create an electronic calling card for our researchers by which a comprehensive picture about the researcher’s scholarly and teaching activities and his/her off-campus life is displayed. They introduce the works and results of research units, support browsing among the research fields and subjects, and help identifying researchers connected to them.

The poster will demonstrate the primary functions of the portal system and the various tools the system offers through the rechannelling of the repository content of the university.

An iDEa to Utilise Repository Content in Innovative Ways

 

8. The University Library in Research Evaluation

Asger Væring Larsen, The University of Southern Denmark, Denmark

The University Library of Southern Denmark participates actively in research evaluation in a number of ways. However, this undertaking is fraught with challenges.

Research has always been evaluated by other researchers, but now there is a tendency for policy makers and research management among others to require more and more detailed assessments of the research – its reach, quality and impact. SDUB’s mission is to support the University in reaching its strategic goals, and the Library is spending considerable resources in this endeavour. A transparent research and publication process which is the result of true Open Science will assist everyone who is engaged with research evaluation, will enable development of new tools and methods and will change the entire game of research evaluation. The challenges that are connected with access to publications, research data and methods will be alleviated by the advent of Open Science leaving us with trying to overcome the inherent conceptual challenges associated with interpreting e.g. bibliometric proxies for research quality and impact. This paper presents the tasks and challenges involved in this context and discuss future library initiatives in bibliometrics, Open Science and data management.

8. The University Library in Research Evaluation

 

9. When Does a Researcher Need a Digital Library? – A Contextual Analysis of Researchers’ Information Needs

Heli Kautonen, National Library of Finland, Finland

While libraries are reshaping their digital services, the work practices of academic researchers across all disciplines are changing. There is evidence of profound changes in the information behaviour of so-called digital natives, but seasoned scholars, too, seem to be adopting new ways of conducting their work. This change poses a challenge to research libraries: we have constantly to update our knowledge of our customers.

People’s information needs are interwoven with aspects of their everyday life. It is, therefore, not adequate to study information behaviour in relation to a single digital service, or even within the context of a library. Recent research has introduced methods that take into account users’ real life context and deepen our understanding of users’ needs.

This paper presents a qualitative analysis of researchers’ needs in relation to the Finnish Digital Library, Finna. Our motivation to study this group of Finna’s users arose from the fact that all Finnish research libraries were to join Finna before 2015. Thus, we had to take into account a large end-user group with variable needs. We adopted a contextual approach and posed the following research questions: When does a researcher need a digital library? How does s/he use a digital library in the research process?

We based the analysis on data from two independent studies: 1) a user survey provided responses from 129 researchers; and 2) a contextual study provided interviews with 12 researchers from different fields of science. We reflected the findings from these two studies, first against each other, and then to the concept of ‘Reconfiguring Access’ by Dutton (2010). This concept depicts the coevolution of technology and social processes in the context of research.

The results did not indicate any dramatic findings or differences between fields of science. The digital library was only an information resource among others. The analysis suggests that as researchers use different information tools in tandem, they also compare the relevance of their functionalities, e.g. search results, at every turn.

The analysis detected only few indications of a wider reconfiguration of use, i.e. how researchers use digital resources for purposes other than information retrieval. These notions of collaboration, observation, analysis, and distribution, which can be seen as signals of change in researchers’ work practices, may be transferable in the development of smarter information environments.

When Does a Researcher Need a Digital Library

 

10. Open Source in Libraries – Opportunity or Threat?

Markku Heinäsenaho, National Library of Finland, Finland

Libraries are dependent on software products in many ways. Sometimes, we need to make little changes in order to fit them to our purpose. However, past experience has shown that this can be very expensive and/or time-consuming. In trying to find our way around the black-box systems we have resorted to hacking, which has brought about even more complexity.

The need for customisation stems, of course, from the technological paradigm shift of the recent past. The rise of the network has transformed the workflows of libraries and given birth to a new set of requirements. Ironically, the systems that we have come accustomed to calling ‘Integrated Library Systems’ have little or no association with these emerged workflows. We have ended up with a wide array of disintegrated systems dealing with acquisition, discovery, link resolving, knowledge bases, digital collections. Managing the resulting complexity has required from us a focus shift away from end user needs and into solving ICT-related problems. While the vendors have been slow in their response, the library community has been forced to act on its own and develop technical skills. Against this backdrop, it is easy to understand why open source is gaining popularity among libraries.

For most libraries professional software development is a relatively unfamiliar domain of activity. We are enthusiastic about the possibilities of open source but sometimes, in my experience, this enthusiasm suppresses the equally important discussion about the responsibilities involved. Because of their almost infinite complexity, information systems are fundamentally unstable and in constant need of maintenance. In order to facilitate this, there are countless best practices for developing, testing, integrating, publishing and maintaining information systems. Needless to say, all this is very well known by the software industry. And yet, most of the software in daily use, some of it produced by the world’s most advanced firms, is a constant source of dissatisfaction to us. Having said that, the decision whether to allocate resources to software engineering and ICT management should not be made lightly. This does not, however, mean that we should be overly pessimistic about the potential of benefitting from open source. The point is merely that there are many things that need to be considered before taking this step. The purpose of this poster is to discuss these considerations.

10.Open source in Libraries

 

11. Science Set Free: An Open Access Infrastructure for Europe

Najla Rettberg, University of Göttingen, Germany

Recently launched, OpenAIRE2020 is the European Union initiative for an Open Access Infrastructure for Research which supports open scholarly communication and access to the research output of European-funded projects. The substantial technical infrastructure operates on two levels:

Gathering research outputs: OpenAIRE gathers open access content from a network of institutional and disciplinary repositories. To put this into practice, an integrated suite of guidelines has been developed so that data sources, namely literature and data repositories, OA publishers and CRIS systems can be harvested and their contents made more visible. The portal gives access to EU-funded scientific publications, and also provides monitoring tools for depositing and usage statistics.

Policy harmonisation and community outreach: OpenAIRE has a collaborative and thriving ‘human’ network, which is pan-European in nature. The community works to advance open access initiatives at national levels. It has National Open Access Desks in nearly 30 countries, and operates a European Helpdesk system for all matters concerning open access, copyright and repository interoperability.

OpenAIRE is starting to move from a publication infrastructure to a more comprehensive infrastructure that covers all types of scientific output, and is establishing an infrastructure to harvest, enrich and store the metadata of scientific datasets. Cross-links from publications to data and funding schemes will be supported. This interlinking of research objects has implications for optimising the research process, allowing the sharing, enrichment and reuse of data.

The poster presented will outline the activities of OpenAIRE. It will also highlight the following themes: advocating open access, repository guidelines, visibility of the European research environment, enhanced publications and sharing and reuse of research data.

Science Set Free

 

12. Write Your Name into the History of Science

Kristina Pai, Anneli Sepp, University of Tartu Library, Estonia

The University of Tartu Library has been offering all its alumni the possibility of granting the library the permission to add their graduation theses to the University’s digital archive DSpace for two years now.

Ten years ago, the UT Library was the first in Estonia to start the current electronic archiving of doctoral theses. The development of a complete collection of e-dissertations is guaranteed by a change in the University regulation concerning the defence of doctoral dissertations, which obliges doctoral students to cooperate with the digital archive. Digitisation of older doctoral theses, defended throughout the University’s 382-year history, was also started in 2004. Today, the University requires that all theses – doctoral, Master’s and Bachelor’s should be electronically archived.

For the project ‘Write Your Name into the History of Science’, we expect alumni to archive their bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral theses and prize-winning essays and studies completed before the onset of the ‘digital age’. We believe it is important that the international scientific community should have electronic access to works that have so far been available only in printed form. Alumni can submit their work for archiving by digitally signing (as it is customary in Estonia) an electronic agreement. The authors permit their works to be digitised at the Library and uploaded to the UT digital archive. Permission can also be obtained from the descendants of deceased alumni. Calls for alumni to submit their works to the digital archive and additional information was promoted via social media and on TV, and via different web pages and community lists.

Today, the digital collection of UT theses and research works contains:

  • 2,443 doctoral theses defended at the University of Tartu during the recent decade;
  • 1,886 theses and studies written from the 17th century up to 1918;
  • 6,985 already born-digital or digitised bachelor’s and master’s theses from the second half of the 19th century up to the present day.

All these materials have been integrated into the DART-Europe E-theses Portal. The UT Library is also ready to archive research data.

UT pays meticulous attention to authors’ rights. For the UT Library, cooperation with alumni is essential in making the theses defended at the University accessible to the students and researchers of today and tomorrow. Our project actively supports the Open Access initiative and we are all for the OA publication principle!

12. Write Your Name into the History of Science

 

14 Open Science State-of-the-Art in the Czech Technical University in Prague

Lenka Nemeckova, Iva Adlerova, Ilona Trtikova, Marta Machytkova, Czech University in Prague, Czech Republic

Imagine an Ideal Open Science academic world – no matter what the level of excellency and research field, researchers all follow similar research cycles: read – get funding – work – finish – (patent) – publish – and … disseminate? There is an Open Science challenge at every stage:

Read – follow OA publications, repositories, DOAJ, use open data.

Get funding – funder’s OA policy, OA text and data requirements.

Work – communicate, cooperate, share data, methodologies, collect and analyse results.

Finish and publish – select medium to publish in; meet funder’s requirements, R&D assessment requirements and institutional OA policies.

Patent brings information embargo during the research process; a significant aspect with regard to Open Science.

Disseminate – self-archive, disseminate research results via Green OA – repositories, social networks, data repositories, etc.

Based on the SPARC Europe Checklist, we have not come far. We have laid solid foundations by implementing parts of Open Science, but some aspects, including user motivation are ‘sci-fi’ for us. We run a repository connected to the University and international infrastructures; we provide OA publishing guidance, including Horizon 2020 requirements; we support ORCID identification; and we help researchers promote their work by OA publishing, self-archiving, data sharing and social networks. We do our best to teach PhD students e-research principles, OA, Open Science, publishing standards, etc. in normal classes as well as through single lectures.

There are many challenges within Open Science. Some aspects, however, are not within the Library’s competencies, so our role is partly one of coordination. We tend to be ahead of our University demands, foresee trends in Open Science publishing and policies, and need to get support by the University management. As such we would need to push implementing institutional and national OA policies, CC licensing, data repositories, open educational materials, etc.

We want to help researchers to get more out of Open Science/OA than they are able at this point. Now, we intend to focus on more aspects of Open Science during the research cycle, on open communication, Open Access publishing and dissemination of research results. We do have success with individual researchers and journal editors. We wish to motivate more pioneers and show that Open Science is a step towards excellence. We need to open their eyes and minds to Open Science to open their opportunities to survive in today’s academic world.

Open Science State-of-the-Art in the Czech Technical University in Prague

 

15. CANCELLED

16 The University Library as an Open Science Partner

Bertil Dorch, Asger Væring Larsen, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark

The University Library of Southern Denmark is increasingly involved in the Open Science movement through different activities which are in line with University strategy and policy. This paper presents a case which shows how these activities come into play in a successful way.

Odense University was established in 1966 as a medical university, but today it is a five faculty institution with ca. 1,500 academics and 30,000 students on six campuses. The Library employs ca. 110 librarians, information specialists and others, supporting the University’s researchers and students. The last couple of years have seen a change in the range and types of services and support functions the Library offers.

Open Science usually covers Open Research and Open Access and thus means unlimited access to research publications, results and methods for everyone. The Library activities in this area include publisher memberships yielding author discounts on Article Processing Charges, dissemination of publications through registration of metadata and full texts, administration of the bibliometric research indicator programme and teaching Responsible Conduct of Research. The case also offers an insight into the additional support offered by other parts of the University. This includes a course in project management, commercialisation of elements of the research results and support in communicating through press releases. Finally, the case exemplifies the development in cooperation between the University and the University Library and shows how Open Science is becoming more integrated into the everyday activities of the entire institution.

The University Library as an Open Science Partner

 

17. Quality Open Access Market

Leo Waaijers, The National Library of The Netherlands

This year we wish to present QOAM (www.qoam.eu) to the LIBER Annual Conference for a second time. QOAM’s mission remains unchanged: ‘Quality Open Access Market is primarily for authors who want to publish their article in open access in a high quality journal and for a reasonable price’, but during the past year QOAM’s development has made considerable progress.

The Journal Score Card has been divided into two separate cards: the Base Score Card and the Valuation Score Card. The Base Score Card analyses the transparency of a journal’s web site and might be completed mainly by libraries wishing to resume their professional role in journal quality control, a role that was lost in the big deal licenses. The Valuation Score Card shares author experiences with a journal. The combination of both scores constitutes a journal’s SWOT matrix, resulting in four journal categories: Strong and Weaker journals, those which are a Threat (to authors) and journals which are an Opportunity (to publishers).

On the price information side, QOAM already collected publication fees as quoted on a journal’s website (via the Base Score Card) and the real price as paid by an author (via the Valuation Score Card). As a new step, QOAM now also gives the discounts that authors get if their institution has settled an OA licence with a publisher. In the Netherlands, for example, this information is provided to QOAM by SURFmarket, the national licencing agency.

Finally, we succeeded in simplifying our log in procedure. QOAM now follows the same system as that used by the popular ResearchGate network; an institutional email address is all you need. Thus QOAM combines ease of access with a limitation to the academic world for publishing Journal Score Cards.

QOAM is an academic self-help instrument that fully depends on the contributions of libraries, authors and journal editors. It is independent of publishers although a growing list of publishers have included their OA and hybrid journals in QOAM for academic judgement. Today QOAM has 17,000+ journals waiting to be scored.

QOAM should become the meeting point where ‘shopping authors’ can select a journal to publish their article in; publishers may find out how to improve their journal and funders; and policy makers, journalists and the public at large can enter a transparent academic publishing environment. For that, QOAM has to go viral like the H-index, ReseachGate or Wikipedia. The aim of our presentation is to achieve just that.

17. Quality Open Access Market

 

18. Open Repository Theseus – A Success Story of 25 Finnish Universities of Applied Sciences

Minna Elina Marjamaa1, Tiina Tolonen2, Anna-Liisa Holmström3 1Laurea University of Applied Sciences; 2Oulu University of Applied Sciences; 3Lahti University of Applied Sciences

Poster

The Theseus poster represents the cooperation model used in building a joint open repository for 25 Finnish Universities of Applied Sciences (UAS). The aim is to showcase our cooperation model created for the Theseus Open Repository, its aim, policy user support and further developments. The model is resource saving for universities as students independently upload their work and user support is centralised with common instructions.

Initiative

In 2008 Finland’s Universities of Applied Sciences created an open repository for theses and research publications. A joint project of UASs to build a common repository helped us to tackle both technical and copyright issues. The essential goal of the project was to make a user-friendly one-stop shop for all UAS research. Soon after the introduction of the repository, the objective proved to be a success. At present, Theseus has approximately 80,000 Bachelor’s and Master’s theses uploaded into the repository.

Further developments

Open Access Statement and the start of self-archiving

In January 2010 Finnish Universities of Applied Sciences declared an Open Access statement together. In this statement, the UASs require all teachers and researchers to save a copy of their research essays published in scientific publications, or in a university publication series, in the Open Repository Theseus.

Nevertheless, the self-archiving of research papers has not yet started on a full scale. For the time being, there are about 500 research publications in Theseus and the number is growing very slowly. Although self-archiving is required, there is as yet no pressure or processes being created for this purpose by UAS management.

Streaming service

Most theses are still in traditional written format, converted into PDF files and uploaded with abstract and metadata to create a record. Yet even from the very beginning, there was a growing interest in creating theses or parts of them as a sound sample or video, and the Theseus initiative took on streaming as one the main objectives of the repository. If all goes well, we will be able to launch the streaming service for Theseus in 2015. We will start by offering streaming for audio-visual works which do not contain material under copyright restrictions.

Open Repository Theseus

 

19. CANCELLED

20. Making Publication-Related Research Data Available: Practices in a University Hospital

Isabelle de Kaenel, Mathilde Panes, Medical Library, University Hospital, Lausanne,

Switzerland

Introduction: The sharing of biomedical research data is important for reasons of transparency and potential re-use in further research. Funding agencies and scientific publishers play a key role in mandating and enabling sharing and are also committed to increasing transparency and promoting reproducibility of data published in research literature. Despite the fact that all signs point to tightening requirements for sharing at the time of publication, research data management planning in Swiss academic institutions is slow in coming.

This poster presents an overview of the current data sharing practices at the University hospital Lausanne (Switzerland).

Methods: We extracted from the institutional repository of the Faculty of Biology and Medicine the list of original articles published in 2014 (around 2,000 publications).

We then focused on 300 peer-reviewed publications which explicitly referred to data analysis (clinical trials, cohort study and experimental research).

These research articles were published in around 200 journals. We investigated the current data policies of these journals. We also investigated if any access to the data could be found in the online versions of these articles. For additional input, we organised interviews with researchers about their commitment to making the datasets publicly available.

Results: About 10% of the articles offered access to primary raw data online, essentially in journals which had specific guidelines concerning research data.

Conclusion: Both publication practices and interviews prove that researchers are not strongly active in giving access to primary data. Libraries cannot promote new scientific practices alone but they can assist in raising awareness and in organising training.

Making Publication-Related Research Data Available Making Publication-Related Research Data Available

 

21. CANCELLED

Meeting of Participants @ Beveridge Hall, Ground Floor
Jun 25 @ 3:30 pm – 4:30 pm
Panel Discussion @ Beveridge Hall, Ground Floor
Jun 25 @ 4:30 pm – 5:30 pm

Research Libraries 2027

PANEL:
Caroline Brazier, British Library
Clifford Lynch, CNI
Kristiina Hormia-Pountanen, LIBER
Elliot Shore, ARL

Panel Discussion

LIBER Executive Board Meeting (by invitation) @ Seminar Room, Dr Lee Centre, Fourth Floor
Jun 25 @ 5:30 pm – 6:30 pm
Conference Reception @ The British Library
Jun 25 @ 6:30 pm – 9:30 pm
Jun
26
Fri
Registration Open @ Entrance Hall, Ground Floor
Jun 26 @ 8:00 am – 4:30 pm
Session 09: Promotion and Engagement @ Beveridge Hall, Ground Floor
Jun 26 @ 9:00 am – 10:30 am

9.1 Social Networks for Research and Open Access: French Researchers at the Crossroads

Christine Okret-Manville, Université Paris-Dauphine, France

To enhance direct communication and dissemination of research findings, researchers benefit from an increasing array of tools: open access repositories, open access journals, free access publishing in hybrid journals. For some years, researchers also tend to use new ways to communicate and share their works, using social networks for research.

In an attempt to foster the development of Open Access in France, the French consortium COUPERIN (Unified Consortium of Higher Education and Research Organisations for Access to Numerical Publications) put forward the hypothesis that social networks for research could perhaps be a valuable medium to reach researchers and convince them to become more involved in Open Access. To test this hypothesis, a nationwide survey was launched in 2014 to explore whether and how these social networks for research are used by French researchers to share content, but also how they are regarded compared with Open Access ‘classical’ tools. Within a month (20 May to 20 June), 1,898 researchers answered this 28-question survey, completed by 1,698 of them, providing COUPERIN with much data to analyse. The respondents roughly reflect the composition of the French academic community in terms of gender and research fields, with a slight overrepresentation of young researchers/ PhD candidates.

This survey does not cover in depth researchers’ opinions about Open Access and social networks for research, and as such presents only global tendencies which would require complementary studies. Nonetheless, it gives many indications as to their use and practice of Open Access, their feelings about the usefulness of these networks compared with repositories to share their findings efficiently. The survey also takes into account differences between disciplines and characterises behaviour and opinions according to the different disciplinary communities and their research practices.

Finally, this survey allows us to define the main characteristics of a tool which could meet French researchers’ needs in terms of scientific communication, putting together the efficiency of repositories to easily disseminate works and give them visibility, the sharing functionality of a network, and the scientific stamp of peer-reviewing, thus highlighting the components of an ideal tool dedicated to Open Science.

Christine Okret-Manville has a PhD in History, a degree in Political Science (Sciences Po Paris), and a diploma in archive and library science (Ecole nationale des chartes, Paris). She started her career in the French Ministry of Higher Education and Research, in charge of the development of electronic documentation, and various libraries networks projects. She joined the Library of the Paris-Dauphine University in 2005 and was appointed Deputy Director in 2012. She is in charge of the documents management department, library services for researchers, and administers the university repository BIRD (http://basepub.dauphine.fr). She is also involved in the Open Access Working Group of the French consortium Couperin where she leads a working party on best practices, and in the Digital Scientific Library think-tank on Open Access formed by the Ministry of Higher Education and Research.

9.1 Social Networks for Research and Open Access

 

9.2 Opening up Research: Librarians as Leaders and Collaborators for Change

Wendy White, Dorothy Byatt and Simon Coles, University of Southampton, UK

This paper will explore six key themes to show how librarians contribute to the advancement of open science. It argues that these developments are prerequisites for success at scale and draws on examples from practice. Finally, it identifies critical success factors for libraries to consolidate a central role in the production and dissemination of open scholarly communication. The key themes are: Leadership Culture; It is important that libraries contribute strategic leadership across administration, education and research. Examples of this include; assessment of staff roles; collaborative approaches to the inclusion of open science in curriculum development; the contribution of the library to open institutional data e.g. research outputs and equipment available in open data format; Research and Service Networks; Support for open science requires networks that bring together a range of experts. The growing role of service triage and consultancy to support data management planning and metadata for discovery will be explored. Libraries are often the key nodal service, placing libraries at the heart of triage.

Change Agents: There is focus on three groups as key agents. PhD students are involved with co-design and delivery of training through the Doctoral College; Early Career researchers working alongside embedded librarians in research groups; Senior academic champions who participate in high level Steering Groups.

Discipline and Inter-disciplinary Led Innovation: This will show how use of open lab notebooks in Chemistry is informing the development of central service models for take up of identifiers. It will also show how interdisciplinary research such as sociologists/computer scientists is informing new methodologies and innovations in open scholarly communication. Pathways to Impact Libraries support the full curation life cycle from data collection to discoverability. The new UK EPSRC Policy Framework on Research Data has seen libraries lead on the development of integrated services to support storage and access to research data. Regional, National and Global Engagement: With the emergence of global initiatives like the Research Data Alliance, UK regional groups N8 and Science and Engineering South and pumpprimed initiatives such as the Jisc Data Spring, joining up policy, practice and standards is the next critical success factor. Libraries are already leading outwith institutions to support global frameworks for normative open science.

Wendy White is Head of Scholarly Communication at the University of Southampton, where her work includes leading the coordination of cross-service initiatives to support the management and discovery of all types of research output. She chairs the University Data Management Steering Group, the Open Access Group and is a member of the Research and Enterprise Executive Committee. She has been involved with a range of projects relating to innovations in open access, repositories, research data and digitisation. She was Principal Investigator for the Jisc-funded institutional DataPool project (2011–13). This built on involvement with other projects; KULTUR (2007–09), looking at curating and sharing research outputs for the visual arts community with the Visual Arts Data Service, as Co-Investigator on IDMB (2009–11), which developed a 10 year strategic roadmap for research data management at Southampton, as Advisory Board member for the ESRC-funded RESTORE projects (2010–14) improving access to research methods materials. Current activity has involved steering a Jisc-funded ORCID pilot and contribution to the collaborative E2E Open Access project exploring metadata requirements. She has ongoing involvement with a number of national initiatives; through the EPSRC-funded IT as a Utility network, she has worked on embedded placements for disciplinary librarians in research groups. She is a member of the Russell Group Open Data Working Group, was a member of HEFCE’s REF Data Collection Steering Group and for many years was a member of the SCONUL Working Group on Information Literacy.

9.2 Opening up Research-Librarians as Leaders and Collaborators for Change

 

9.3 dissem.in: Open Access Policies Made Easy

Antonin Delpeuch, École Normale Supérieure, France

Many institutions adopt open access policies, requiring researchers to make their articles freely available in a repository. Enforcing these policies is far from straightforward however: according to a recent study in the UK, each article costs an estimated 33 GBP of staff time to ensure compliance with the RCUK policy. Researchers often consider these policies as a burden: they need to understand the requirements of their publishers and their institutions, and to spend time uploading their articles to various repositories, with the appropriate metadata.

We propose to lower these barriers with dissem.in, a platform that leverages various metadata sources to get a clear picture of the access status of publications. The platform allows researchers and librarians to search for papers filtered by two criteria: full text availability in open repositories and publisher preprint policy. This enables us to compute a list of papers that are not available in repositories yet, but that could safely be uploaded to repositories given the preprint policy of the publisher. We expect such a tool to be very useful to implement open access policies.

The web platform is a free software still under development, and is being tested at École Normale Supérieure. A proof of concept is running at http://ens.dissem.in. There are two technical challenges behind such a project, the first one being the processing of gigabytes of metadata, available from disparate sources in heterogeneous formats. The second one is that author names are ambiguous, often incomplete and noisy. We address this problem using a novel machine learning algorithm that groups similar papers together and assesses their relevance for the department of the candidate author. The next step in the project will be the integration of the SWORD protocol. Researchers will be able to upload easily their articles to any SWORD-compliant platform, for instance their institution’s own repository. As dissem.in already knows the associated metadata, uploading an article should be as simple as providing a PDF file. This should hence considerably speed up the deposit process and eventually reduce the cost of open access.

The presentation will consist in an interactive overview of the system, using a live demo. We will focus on concrete use cases rather than on the underlying algorithms. The questions and reactions of the audience should be very useful to tailor the tool to the community’s needs.

Antonin Delpeuch is a graduate student in natural language processing at the University of Cambridge. He holds a BSc in Computer Science from École Normale Supérieure in Paris, and is involved in the implementation of an open access policy there. He has been working on dissem.in as a side project since September 2014. When he is not tuning his machine learning algorithms, he enjoys hiking and cycling around Cambridge.

9.3 Slides: dissem.in
      Web: http://association.dissem.in/

Session 10: Support and Training @ Senate Room, First Floor
Jun 26 @ 9:00 am – 10:30 am

10.1 Where Librarians Can Learn and Teach Open Science for European Researchers

Astrid Orth and Birgit Schmidt, Göttingen State and University Library, Germany
Dan North, LIBER

Training European researchers and professionals in Open Science is both a necessity and a challenge, in particular to further facilitate the European Commission’s Open Access and Open Data policies as adopted for the Horizon2020 research framework and by many other research funders across Europe and worldwide. Finding good resources for teaching and training can, however, be challenging, despite or even because institutions and national initiatives have developed and delivered high-quality training content which is widely dispersed online but so far not systematically harnessed and shared with the community. This makes it difficult for librarians to establish services and training for their users.

The FOSTER project is aimed at identifying, enriching and providing training content on all relevant topics in the area of Open Science for the European research community. It will equip librarians and other enablers in the research process with the necessary tools and materials to learn and teach all the facets of Open Science. Knowledge managers and librarians are guided by learning objectives specifically developed for them to be able quickly to identify the topics most relevant to them and their clientele. Our training toolkit provides assistance and a range of examples to enable the adoption of materials and courses to learn and teach Open Science.

The training resources collected and freely available in the FOSTER Training Portal are provided under open licenses; have been identified from reliable resources and quality assured by the FOSTER consortium; have additionally been developed for a series of FOSTER training sessions held in 2014 (continuing in 2015); are multi-disciplinary and multi-lingual; use and support a variety of training methods and formats; can be contributed to by interested members of the ‘Open’ communities; are qualified in several categories: e.g. relevant topics (such as Open Access, Open Data, Open Science, Open Metrics and Impact, Funder policies, Copyright and legal issues, etc.), audiences (academic staff, institutions, research project managers, policy makers) and knowledge level.

This presentation will showcase the FOSTER Training Portal and its Open Science taxonomy. It will describe the process of how to identify relevant training topics, select suitable resources and combine them into a training offering.

Astrid Orth works on international and national projects and initiatives in the Electronic Publishing Unit in Göttingen State and University Library, with a strong focus on policies and services that enhance open access and research data management in libraries. In 2014 she joined the recently-started FOSTER project as Project Officer (www. fosteropenscience.eu), which creates Open Science training materials for key stakeholders in European research.

10.1 Where Librarians can Learn and Teach Open Science for Researchers

 

10.2 Innovative Research Services: The Library and Research Services Facilitating Open Science at Queen’s University

Sharon A. Murphy and Karina McInnis, Queen’s University, Canada

This session will present a case study on how Research Administration and the Library collaborate at Queen’s University in support of open science. Key recommendations of The University’s Strategic Research Plan (2012–17) include:

  1. 1. Foster knowledge translation where the outcomes of our research can benefit society.
  2. Explore evolving emphasis on Open Access. Our strong collaborative relationship, including IT Services, creates support for Queen’s researchers’ activities from research development and grant writing to publishing and impact assessment. This presentation will focus on our initiatives to support new, creative solutions to research data management and scientific communication that strategically help to manage the growing wave of research data, to host research outputs, and to maximise their accessibility. Examples of co-operative initiatives include the Queen’s Research Data Committee, Research Data Day, Scholarly Communications and Research Data Working Groups, and the QSpace institutional repository. Several of these are the outcomes of a jointly envisioned eScience Strategic Agenda.

Collaboration makes it possible for researchers to find the supports and services they need in one spot and without duplicating efforts – administrators and researchers alike. One example is a current electronic services project that will enable our new CV and annual (faculty member) merit reporting tool to be a mechanism for open access deposit into the University’s institutional repository. This creative solution will facilitate compliance with the soon to be released Open Access Policy from the Canadian Tri-Council granting agencies (i.e. SSHRC, CIHR, NSERC). Queen’s Research Services and the Library are also collaborating on the expansion of data management plan services, with the goal of increasing availability of research data, data sharing, and increasing the impact of research output.

A discussion of Canadian national policy development and initiatives, national organization partnerships and how our work at Queen’s connects to these activities will conclude our presentation.

Sharon Murphy, Head, Academic Services, Queen’s University Library

10.2 Innovative Research Services 

 

10.3 More Than Sum of its Parts: the Biodiversity Heritage Library as a Case Study in Open Science

Jane E. Smith, Natural History Museum, UK Constance Rinaldo

This case study demonstrates how the Biodiversity Heritage Library (BHL) partners have worked collaboratively to make biodiversity literature available as part of a global community. BHL (www.biodiversitylibrary.org) provides scientists, scholars and the public free and open access to nearly 46 million pages of digitised text and grey literature on biodiversity. BHL is mature and sustainable as a virtual organisation and digital repository. It supports open science and wider cultural uses by continuing to add relevant content, curating that content and enhancing access through the development and application of innovative tools. The availability and reusability of the scientific data accessible via BHL ranges from taxonomic study and training, biodiversity research, conservation and maintenance of diverse ecosystems, animal and plant disease control through to audiences beyond core science constituencies, including historical and cultural research on science, exploration and global commerce.

Innovative services include data mining and taxonomic name finding so that the data that is of most value to scientists on that page are extracted from the OCR text (taxonomic names). An example of support for wider open use of content is the Art of Life Project supporting the extraction of illustrations within pages. Scientists are using BHL content during training courses and while on fieldwork. Virtual exhibitions of curated content are available, on broad interest topics such as exploration and spices.

Working together has allowed partners to combine and link their collections in ways that provide a more complete research resource. Collaboration on standards, best practices and infrastructure solutions has produced better images, metadata and support tools, achievement of long-term digital storage solutions and the sharing and cost reduction of scanning operations.

Jane Smith joined the Natural History Museum in 2006 as Head of Library Collections and Services, and has been Head of the Department of Library and Archives since September 2012. The NHM Library and Archives (www.nhm.ac.uk/ library) holds one of the world’s largest natural history collections of published works and original material, including manuscripts, maps and scientific artworks. She is overseeing the Library and Archive programme to digitise those collections and this includes leading the NHM’s contribution to the Biodiversity Heritage Library (BHL). Most of her career has been spent in medical and scientific research libraries where her roles have focused on developing services that widen access to collections, including digitisation, and providing new ways to support researchers has underpinned all the Library projects she has been involved in.

10.3 More than the Sum of its Parts

Session 11: Transparency & Reproducibility @ Court Room, First Floor
Jun 26 @ 9:00 am – 10:30 am

11.1 ISTEX: An Innovative Scientific Repository for the French Research Community

Raymond Berard, Claire Francois and Laurent Schmitt, INIST-CNRS, France
Jean-Marie Pierrel, University of Lorraine, France

ISTEX is a project launched in 2012 and funded by the National Agency for Research (ANR). It is part of the ‘Investments for the future’ programme initiated by the French Ministry for Higher Education and Research. The two main objectives of ISTEX are to acquire retrospective collections of scientific publications (articles, monographs, etc.) and to set up a platform that will host all the data and offer advanced services of research and delivery. This paper will focus on the second aspect of ISTEX: how to build a normalised, uniform and enriched data repository that will support scientific research.

In addition to providing search engine services across articles and collections, and full-text indexing, the ISTEX team is currently working towards offering three types of data enrichment: terminology extraction processes for terms and their variants; named entity recognition; and cited bibliographic reference identification from unstructured full-texts.

Moreover, several sub-projects have been founded with the aim of showing how labs could use ISTEX resources in the framework of their surveys or research. Firstly, the CILLEX project, led by CLLE in Toulouse, aims to develop metrological tools founded on the structures of small world networks, which are omnipresent in the documentary bases, in order better to identify the pertinent information. Secondly, the ISTEX-R project, carried out by LORIA, ATILF and the INIST, targets the creation of tools for access to textual content, to build on and capitalise knowledge in a given scientific domain. It aims to complete the basic platform by a content analysis, to characterise the evolution of research and knowledge with time. Finally, the LorExplor project proposes to constitute an open source library of Xml components to build research systems, corpus exploration servers and data curation chains to reply to specific needs (special survey, bibliography, meta-analysis, etc.).

In this paper we will describe the three levels of the ISTEX platform: the basic treatments, the enrichment processes and the research working sub-projects included in the ISTEX framework. Our main objective is to show how this French initiative is a ‘win win’ step for both libraries and research.

Laurent Schmitt is a research engineer at the French National Research Centre (CNRS), and heads the ‘Projects and Innovation’ department at INIST-CNRS, which facilitates access to scientific results from all fields of world research, promotes scientific production and provides services to people in Higher Education and Research in France. He is also in charge of ISTEX work packages dedicated to INIST: the development of the ISTEX platform which will host, enrich and disseminate all of the acquired data. He is dual trained as computer scientist and also in natural language computing.

11.1 ISTEX

11.2 Selecting Research Data for Reuse: Challenges During the Implementation of Support for Data Archiving in Research Libraries

Ana Elisabeth van Meegen Silva, Vrije University Amsterdam, The Netherlands

This paper offers a new approach for improvement and cooperation on data collection management for research libraries. As a consequence of a scientist’s interest or curiosity, every object or digital asset can become input for research and consequently be called scientific data. Research libraries are adopting a variety of new responsibilities to help researchers with their data collections, giving support during planning, gathering, managing, sharing and archiving scientific data. This paper will focus on the libraries’ task of archiving and disseminating research data, offering a reflection on the challenges that research libraries in the Netherlands face when implementing support for data archiving and diffusion.

Dutch libraries have basically two main roles when supporting their institutions with data archiving. First, libraries can be responsible for the institutional data archive. The institutional archive has a different function than a data repository. According to the Netherlands Code of Conduct for Scientific Practice, scientific results such as data should be made available to peers for verification on accuracy and truthfulness. Each research institution has responsibility for archiving all the scientific data that has been used as evidence for a theoretical framework, and which has resulted in a publication for at least ten years. Libraries can manage the local archive and give access to the data for control purposes when needed.

A second important role on data appraisal for libraries is opening up data for reuse. Knowledge of collection management applies to all libraries, but selection criteria for research data differ considerably from acquisition criteria for publications. The selection of data is not based on the question whether the object fits in the library collection, but whether the object is relevant for others. General selection criteria on data selection are available in different studies on this subject. In this paper a brief overview is presented. The remaining challenge for libraries is to transform those general criteria to suit the needs of data reusability for a specific discipline. Each research library has its own collection management profile with core elements that are common to all scientific practitioners. For the selection and publication of data, every library will implement its own collection model in accordance with its research fields, cost models and (inter)national appointments for specific collections.

Ana van Meegen is Data Librarian at the Vrije University Amsterdam and a member of the Special Interest Group (SIG) Research Data at the Netherlands. Since 2012 she has been working on developing data management support at her own University and in co-operation with other research libraries and different stakeholders.

11.2 Selecting research data for reuse

 

11.3 Transparency: The Emerging Third Dimension of Open Science

Elizabeth Josephine Lyon, University of Pittsburgh, USA

Presenting the 3D Model of Open Science Lyon (2009) described a Continuum of Openness with two orthogonal axes: Access and Participation. The 2D model is extended here to include a third dimension: transparency. An overview of transparency initiatives to create open and reproducible science protocols, processes and products, is grounded within scholarly communications, the research life cycle, and the role of libraries. Initiatives described include principles of replication and reproducibility, the controversy around peerreview failures and the current retraction epidemic. Practical approaches towards greater transparency, including electronic laboratory notebooks and workflow sharing platforms, the Reproducibility Initiative, Reproducibility Projects in Cancer and Psychology, the Science Exchange Validation Service and the publication format of Registered Reports, will be assessed. Open data peer-review processes and incentivising efforts e.g. GigaScience partnership with Publons, will be described. Five thematic questions will be addressed:

  1. How does this trend or initiative impact on libraries
  2. What new skills and knowledge are required by librarians
  3. What new library services might be developed
  4. What partnerships will be required
  5. What LIS leadership opportunities will emerge?

Identifying new LIS opportunities to promote transparency in open science, academic libraries have a key role in engaging and contributing in this arena, and there are implications for library service development and LIS education. Four innovative action steps are proposed:

  1. 1. Lead on inclusion of transparency principles as part of institutional policy: ensure that OA and RDM policy reflect the third dimension of open science, through requirements for transparent science processes, methodologies and peer review
  2. Act as a transparency advocate with faculty: new Research Data Services can include advising on reproducible methods, and validation approaches with reproducibility training for new-entrant researchers
  3. Adopt infrastructure to support open protocols and processes: libraries can build on open data repositories, and existing disciplinary infrastructure for open source code hubs, open workflow and methods banks
  4. Produce transparency-savvy LIS graduates: University of Pittsburgh iSchool course exemplars (Research Data Management and Research Data Infrastructures), which address reproducibility, validation and transparency, will be described.

Dr Liz Lyon is a Visiting Professor in the School of Information Sciences (iSchool), University of Pittsburgh, where she teaches new graduate classes on Research Data Management and Research Data Infrastructures. She has a PhD in Biological Sciences and was previously Associate Director of the UK Digital Curation Centre and Director of UKOLN Informatics at the University of Bath. Her research includes developing an understanding of disciplinary capability for data-intensive research with funding from Microsoft Research. She is a frequent international speaker, giving keynotes in North America, Europe and Australasia. She has served on various Boards, including the NSF Advisory Committee for Cyber-Infrastructure and as Co-Chair of the DataONE International Advisory Board.

11.3 Transparency-The Emerging Third Dimension of Open Science

Session 12: Preservation & Reproducibility @ Woburn Suite, Ground Floor
Jun 26 @ 9:00 am – 10:30 am

12.1 Preservation of Enhanced Publications

Barbara Sierman, National Library of the Netherlands
Paula Witkamp, DANS Data Archiving and Networked Services, The Netherlands

For several years now the concept of ‘enhanced publications’, here understood as ‘a digital object in context’, is an identified phenomenon, especially from a theoretical point of view. One of the strong advocates of getting a grip on this kind of material was the Driver project, resulting in a conceptual model. But the developments around a digital object with links to other objects are continuing rapidly. The boundaries of what is a publication in the traditional sense becomes fluid. Data, websites, movies, all can become essential as context for a publication. These elements are not necessary preserved in one place. This poses a challenge for organisations that traditionally want to preserve such material and give access to the whole set of related information. Either by mandate (national library and archive) or because it is part of their responsibilities (university libraries, data centres, etc.)

In this presentation we will describe the results of the Enhanced Publications project, carried out by members of the Dutch National Coalition of Digital Preservation (NCDD). Starting with the use case of the digital academic thesis, an overview was created of organisations that are involved in the preservation of the thesis itself and its context, like related sources and data sets. This overview helped to identify responsibilities for and risks for preserving the context. As it turned out that more organisations than expected were involved, coordination in digital preservation is needed. To achieve this, a set of recommendations will help to implement necessary measures. The results of the (rather straightforward) case of the academic thesis will feed into further studies of more complicated cases of digital objects in context, that will be preserved for long-term access by Dutch organisations.

Barbara Sierman MA is Digital Preservation Manager in the Research Department of the National Library of the Netherlands. She studied Dutch and was library consultant at PICA (now OCLC). After years as an IT consultant at Cap Gemini, she joined the KB in 2005. She is involved in the development of the ISO standards 16363 Audit and Certification of Trustworthy Digital Repositories and ISO 161919 Requirements for bodies providing audit and certification of candidate trustworthy digital repositories. In the SCAPE project she was responsible for the creation of the Catalogue of Preservation Policy Elements. She regularly blogs on digitalpreservation.nl/seeds.

12.1 Preservation of Enhanced Publications

 

12.2 Open and Reproducible Analytical Workflows in the Humanities: The Case of Finnish Bibliographic Metadata

Leo Lahti, University of Wageningen, The Netherlands
M ikko Tolonen and Krister Lindén, University of Helsinki, Finland
Maija Paavolainen, Helsinki University Library, Finland

The principles of open science are often applauded, but in the humanities rarely implemented in practice. This will change with concrete proof of the usefulness of shared open research data and methods in collaborative projects (including libraries, researchers, data management, faculty and students). Our idea is to establish and study Reproducible Analytical Workflows (RAW) by constructing open source environments that combine data and information resources, statistical analysis and automated reports. To introduce the RAW model to the humanities in Finland, we are launching a pilot project at the University of Helsinki based on our earlier experiments with early modern British and American metadata investigating the ESTC within a reproducible workflow to provide transparent quantitative analysis of knowledge production: https://github. com/rOpenGov/estc/blob/master/inst/examples/summary.md

This paper considers similar tools constructed to analyse the Finnish National Bibliography (1488–1917) based on the same quantitative and open source research tools that we developed in the context of the British Library Data Collections. Our aim is to make these methods widely known and accessible, reaching university education already at an undergraduate level. Integrating the services of data management infrastructure is an important component of the automated workflow. FIN-CLARIN, hosting the language bank of Finland, offers a repository for the bibliographic data and a search engine, which enables the students and teachers to select and download data samples using a familiar search environment. The data can be further processed with standard analytical tools and compared with visualizations of the original data. Researchers and more advanced students may venture into modifying the visualizations for their own purposes as reproducible statistical workflows.

The University Library information literacy education will further integrate the RAW model in the curriculum. In order to introduce students to open data methods, teaching will start with a simple interface and samples, and aim at real research use of the data and creating an understanding of data, methods, collaboration and reporting in the open science process so that the whole becomes constructively aligned. A problem-driven approach to teaching and supporting the work with teamwork and social tools will enhance the learning outcomes. Open science workflow involves the library at every step of the way.

Professor Mikko Tolonen has a background in intellectual history. His monograph, Mandeville and Hume: Anatomists of Civil Society, published in Oxford University Studies in the Enlightenment in 2013 combined the study of history of philosophy and book history. According to some reviews, it was a pioneering approach. Currently he continues his efforts to use book history to answer research questions in the tradition of intellectual history in a multidisciplinary project with a data scientist Dr Leo Lahti. Previously he has collaborated widely internationally, for example, publishing with Noel Malcolm about Thomas Hobbes’s correspondence based on the use of auction sale catalogues.

12.2 Open and Reproducible Analytical Workflows in the Humanities

12.3 Actions to Ensure the Integrity and Continuity of the Scholarly Record

Peter Michael Burnhill, Adam Rusbridge and Muriel Mewissen, University of Edinburgh, UK
Herbert Van De Sompel, Los Alamos National Laboratory Research Library, USA
Gaelle Bequet, ISSN International Centre, France

Recall a time when research libraries held much of what we call the scholarly record. Research libraries had the role of ‘holding library’ exercised by also providing support to many more ‘access libraries’, through inter-library lending and other forms of document supply. To provide access also meant to keep content, for use today and tomorrow. That was then. Much of the same could be said of the government documents and newspapers now that so much is issued online.

Today, it is the publishers of that content who provide researchers and students with an ease of access that once would only have been imagined. Today, research libraries have become customers on their behalf not custodians of content, their e-collections really only e-connections. Providing continued access to the scholarly record remains an essential task. So, how may research libraries ensure that the scholarly record and the resources needed for scholarship remain under the effective control of libraries – either placed into the custody of consortia of research libraries, national libraries or entrusted to the care of third parties? Evidence from the Keepers Registry will be used to report on the extent to which e-journal content is being archived, and would seem to be at risk of loss.

The scholarly record is under threat in another way. Much of the value in scholarly statement rests upon what is cited in order that argument or evidence can be checked and re-assessed. Increasingly, citation is for reference made to what is issued on the web. However, there is a lack of fixity for web references. What is there at the time of writing (or even earlier, when notetaking) may not be there when the scholarly statement is read later by other researchers or students. Reference rot is the term coined for the combined effect of ‘link rot’ (404 – Page Not Found) and ‘content drift’ (when content changes over time, or is now a completely different website). Evidence from the Hiberlink project will be presented alongside proposed remedies that might avoid or at least stop the rot.

There is need for co-operative action, at regional, national and trans-national level with appropriate division of labour. This requires intelligence gathering to establish what digital content is being archived for future use, and what should be regarded as having priority for attention for fear that it may be lost. It requires support from leaders and specialists in and across research libraries, among others.

Peter Burnhill is Director of EDINA, the Jisc centre for digital expertise and service delivery at the University of Edinburgh. He provides leadership in the development and delivery of services to universities and colleges in the UK and beyond. A statistician, researcher and senior lecturer by background, he has worked to support library activity for over 20 years. He led the first web-based serials union catalogue (SALSER) and the first UK serials union catalogue (SUNCAT), and now has keen focus on ways to ensure continuing access and integrity of the scholarly record given the shift to digital, engaged with thekeepers.org and hiberlink. org. He also led the set up of Edinburgh University Data Library, EDINA and the Digital Curation Centre. He is Past President of IASSIST (the association for data librarians and archivists), an honorary Fellow of the Royal Scottish Geographical Society and Observer with the ISSN Network.

12.3 Actions to Ensure the Integrity and Continuity of the Scholarly Record

 

12.4 The Missing Piece: Saving Software for Reproducible Research

Jez Cope, Imperial College London, UK

Reproducibility has always been a central pillar of scientific research. The journal article is the gold standard in enabling this, describing the motivation, methods, results and conclusions of a piece of work. It is generally impossible to include the full underlying data within a paper, so authors instead make do with summaries, statistics and carefully-selected subsets. This approach makes it difficult to validate the conclusions of the paper, and to overcome this shortcoming there is increasing pressure on researchers to improve access to their underlying datasets.

However, the data is only half of the story. The calculations required to generate or analyse it are often too complex to give more than a general sketch in the methods section. When another researcher tries to reproduce the analysis, they quickly discover that there are many implementation details and edge cases left out of the description. The inevitable conclusion is that it is impossible to reproduce and validate another’s results without also having access to their software.

Software poses new challenges for all involved with its curation and preservation. It is not sufficient to preserve only the source code: the ability to reproduce a given set of results also depends on specific versions of language tools, libraries and a full stack of infrastructure right down to the hardware. The usefulness of the code also relies on the skill of the programmer in documenting and structuring it in a logical, comprehensible fashion, for which training needs to be provided by an experienced professional. Research software is continually evolving, so it is important to link each published result to the specific iteration of the software that produced it.

This paper will argue that the bespoke software written for research should be recognised as an irreplaceable part of the scholarly record, and as such needs management, curation and preservation alongside the data it is created to generate or analyse. Initiatives such as Software Carpentry (http:// software-carpentry.org/) and groups such as the Software Sustainability Institute (http://software.ac.uk/) are making great progress in raising awareness of these issues and providing training. Research libraries, with their traditional responsibility for managing and preserving the scholarly ‘inputs’ and ‘outputs’ of their institution, have an important part to play in developing their institutions’ ‘software collection’.

Jez Cope is currently Research Data Support Manager in the Library of Imperial College London. He is responsible for developing a research data management service within the Library to train and advise researchers of all levels and to develop an infrastructure for data curation, preservation and sharing. This includes engaging directly with researchers, developing the skills and knowledge of library staff in this area and working across all support services at the College. He previously worked at the University of Bath, where he played a major part in setting up research data management infrastructure through the Jiscfunded Research360 project, as well as developing a virtual research environment for the Centre for Sustainable Chemical Technologies and spearheading social media training for postgraduate students and early career researchers. He also has several years of experience in computational systems biology research, following on from a degree in mathematics and computer science, and occasionally contributes to opensource software projects (including the Open Access Button: www.openaccessbutton.org). This gives him a particular appreciation of the importance of software to the research process and the importance of recognising it as a first-class research output.

12.4 Saving Software for Reproducible Research

COFFEE BREAK @ MacMillan Hall/Crush Hall, Ground Floor Posters/Exhibition in Beveridge Hall, Ground Floor
Jun 26 @ 10:30 am – 11:00 am
Plenary Session @ Beveridge Hall, Ground Floor
Jun 26 @ 11:00 am – 11:45 am

What Does it Take to Make Networked and Open Science Sustainable?

INVITED SPEAKER: Ms Catriona MacCallum, Senior Advocacy Manager, Public Library of Science (PLOS), USA

The traditional scholarly cycle is being disrupted by interactions between new players, new services and new platforms, resulting in an emerging network of collaborators, communities and innovative forms of scholarly discourse that extend beyond the academy. Taking advantage of this network requires a transformation in the way we think about scholarly communication, and a transformation in the publishing industry to one that is focused on services rather than on products.

The internet and Open Access are just the first steps. Both provide opportunities to drive down the fixed costs of traditional publishing and increase the accessibility and utility of published research but both create challenges. Production, distribution and dissemination can potentially become cheaper but the non-cash cost of peer review done by academics is largely unaffected and there are new costs in managing the transition to full open access and creating the networked infrastructure to support it.

Publishing is at a cross roads. We can largely uphold 20th Century forms of publishing and scientific discourse and try and commodify and contain the network or we can fundamentally re-evaluate what is needed and what we want in this new environment. What are the services required to ensure that research is trustworthy and re-usable, disseminated effectively and efficiently, and evaluated appropriately? How can we foster systems and services that are transparent, open to new players, subject to real competition and which scale as the network grows?

The sustainability of such a networked system of services will rest on a shared community governance across many different stakeholders, a governance that enables common standards, such as ORCID, and an interoperable infrastructure that can take advantage of rapidly changing technology. The bigger challenge is that it requires cooperation and trust among all stakeholders, including those that have traditionally been excluded from the scholarly lifecycle.

Catriona MacCallum is currently Senior Advocacy Manager at PLOS, a Consulting Editor on PLOS ONE and a member of the Board of OASPA (the Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association). She joined PLOS from Elsevier in July 2003 as one of the launch editors of PLOS Biology. She was a Senior Editor on PLOS Biology for 10 years, primarily responsible for handling papers in ecology and evolutionary biology. She was also involved in the planning stages of the PLOS community journals and PLOS ONE. She studied Zoology at Edinburgh University, remaining there to do a PhD on the evolutionary ecology and genetics of speciation with Nick Barton.

She joined the Elsevier journal Trends in Ecology & Evolution as assistant Editor in 1998, becoming Editor in 1999 and Managing Editor in 2001. She also took a sabatical from PLoS in 2007–08 as an invited Fellow of the Institute of Advanced Studies in Berlin. She has spoken and written extensively about the transformation of scholarly publishing and is a keen advocate of open access, open science, and the reform of scholarly communication.

What does it take to make Networked and Open Science Sustainable

Library Innovation Awards @ Beveridge Hall, Ground Floor
Jun 26 @ 11:45 am – 12:00 pm
Sponsor Strategy Update @ Beveridge Hall, Ground Floor
Jun 26 @ 12:00 pm – 12:30 pm

Springer Compact: Make Researchers Comply with their Funders’ Open Access Policies

Wim van der Stelt, Springer, The Netherlands

In several European countries – especially in the UK and the Netherlands – the development of open access policies has reached a new phase. From just talking about it, the step to enforcing and implementing has been made.

Springer is proud to be a frontrunner in the discussions about this exciting next step and to have negotiated a new type of arrangement with some of the major partners: JISC in the UK, VSNU in the Netherlands, and major customers in Germany. These arrangements all have their own individual characteristics, but they share the result: researchers publishing in the vast majority of Springer’s traditional journals will comply with the rules of their funders. Wim van der Stelt will explain Springer’s open access policies, Springer’s commitment to the further development of open access and will give insight in the issues and opportunities Springer has discussed with library, consortium and university partners, while building this new type of publishing and reading arrangements.

Wim van der Stelt will also focus upon possible next steps now: what are the decisive circumstances that enable the successful implementation of these arrangements and what can other countries, libraries and/or funders do to set that next step also.

Wim van der Stelt has been responsible for corporate and publishing strategy at Springer since the merger with Kluwer Academic in 2004. Springer’s editorial innovations and cooperation with bold new players in the publishing market are contributing to the reputation Springer has for creative publishing solutions.

Wim’s focus on Open Access has brought Springer to the forefront of the open access publishing community. He played a major role in developing Springer Open Choice (Springer’s hybrid open access option), the acquisition of BioMed Central and fast growth of the number of full open access journals at Springer. At present his focus is on managing the transition to Open Access and on continuing to serve academic communities while setting the conditions for open access. Wim is very active in global discussions about open access, is a regular speaker globally and was a member of the Finch committee in the UK.

Springer Compact

Sponsor: Strategy Update @ Beveridge Hall, Ground Floor
Jun 26 @ 12:30 pm – 1:00 pm

Choosing and Implementing a Discovery Tool: The Case of EDS at Hebrew University

Edith Falk, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel

Discovery services are the gateway to research and institutions’ collections. There is much to consider when evaluating discovery services: the user experience, seamless access to full text, and, primarily, the relevance of results. It is also important to evaluate the inter-operability of the discovery tool with other systems used by the institution.

In this presentation, Edith Falk, Chief Librarian of the Hebrew University Jerusalem will discuss her extensive experiences with discovery and how the platform plays a strategic role in fulfilling the library’s mission. Edith will look at the evaluation factors; the process of implementing the tool within the library systems, the usage by a variety of users; and the impact of the discovery on the use of the library resources.

Edith Falk is the Chief Librarian of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. She is mainly interested in the implementation of new systems and technologies in the institution’s libraries.

Choosing and implementing a discovery tool at Hebrew University

YouTube video : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BOdccELm_pk

Conference Close and Lunch @ Beveridge Hall, Ground Floor
Jun 26 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Farewell Reception @ MacMillan Hall/Crush Hall, Ground Floor
Jun 26 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm
LIBER Quarterly Editorial Board Meeting (by invitation) @ Durning-Lawrence Library, Fourth Floor
Jun 26 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm